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The Mysterious 1908 Tunguska Event in Russia


The Tunguska event, or Tunguska blast or Tunguska explosion, was an enormously powerful explosion that occurred near the Podkamennaya Tunguska River in what is now Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia, at about 7:14 a.m. KRAT (0:14 UT) on June 30 [O.S. June 17, 1908.

The explosion is believed to have been caused by the air burst of a large meteoroid or comet fragment at an alt itude of 5--10 kilometres (3--6 mi) above the Earth's surface. Different studies have yielded varying estimates of the object's size, with general agreement that it was a few tens of metres across.

The number of scholarly publications on the problem of the Tunguska explosion since 1908 may be estimated at about 1,000 (mainly in Russian). Many scientists have participated in Tunguska studies, the best-known of them being Leonid Kulik, Yevgeny Krinov, Kirill Florensky, Nikolai Vladimirovich Vasiliev and Wilhelm Fast.

Although the meteoroid or comet burst in the air rather than hitting the surface, this event is still referred to as an impact. Estimates of the energy of the blast range from 5 to as high as 30 megatons of TNT (21--130 PJ), with 10--15 megatons of TNT (42--63 PJ) the most likely—roughly equal to the United States' Castle Bravo thermonuclear bomb tested on March 1, 1954, about 1,000 times more powerful than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, and about one-third the power of the Tsar Bomba, the largest nuclear weapon ever detonated. The explosion knocked over an estimated 80 million trees covering 2,150 square kilometres (830 sq mi).

It is estimated that the shock wave from the blast would have measured 5.0 on the Richter scale. An explosion of this magnitude is capable of destroying a large metropolitan area. This possibility has helped to spark discussion of asteroid deflection strategies.

The Tunguska event is the largest impact event over land in Earth's recent history. Impacts of similar size over remote ocean areas would most likely have gone unnoticed before the advent of global satellite monitoring in the 1960s and 1970s.

 Video of the Tunguska Explosion in Siberia (1908)


Read more about The Tunguska Mystery: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Tunguska_event

The Tunguska Impact--100 Years Later http://science.nasa.gov/ science-news/ science-at-nasa/2008/ 30jun_tunguska/

Tunguska event http:// www.thunderbolts.info/tpod/ 2006/arch06/ 060202tunguska.htm


The Tunguska Event, Journal of the British Astronomical Association
Probable asteroidal origin of the Tunguska Cosmic Body (pdf)
Perplexities of the Tunguska meteorite
Sandia supercomputers offer new explanation of Tunguska disaster" . Sandia National Laboratories
Scientists investigating the Tunguska Event http://www.TunguskaMystery.info/Tunguska_Event

Mysterious Tunguska Explosion of 1908 in Siberia may be linked to Tesla's experiments of wireless transmission
http://www.teslasociety.com/tunguska.htm

Tunguska websites:    

Tunguska Home Page of Bologna University
“On June 30th, 1908, something exploded 8 km above the Stony Tunguska river. About 2150 square kilometers of Siberian taiga were devastated and 80 millions trees were overthrown. Up to now, it is not clear whether the great explosion was due to a comet or an asteroid or something else. We are searching for an answer.”

The Tunguska Meteorite Website of members of the Independent Tunguska Exploration Group (ITEG). “We wish the ITEG to live and continue its investigations. Its work will certainly inspire future generations of Tunguska enthusiasts…” In Russian.

The Tunguska Phenomenon The richest ever collection of materials on the history and current state of the Tunguska investigations. In Russian. 

The Tunguska event Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. 

Tunguska_Ru An informative website containing many valuable Tunguska-related materials, including wonderful photographs and the Catalog of the Tunguska Eyewitness Reports. Authored by Vitaly Romeyko. In Russian. 

The National Nature Reserve Tungussky The National Nature Reserve Tungussky was established in 1996 by the Federal Government of Russia. It occupies an area of 3000 square kilometers and is kept in its primordial state. Generally in Russian state nature reserves, visits by tourists are forbidden, but the Tunguska nature reserve is exempted from this rule and everyone wishing to visit this area with its unforgettable aura can do so.  In Russian.

The Tunguska Phenomenon This website provides information about Tunguska investigations conducted by Krasnoyarsk Branch of the Independent Tunguska Exploration Group. In Russian.




List of unexplained explosion events

 

Google Satellite Map of Russia, Krasnoyarsk Krai, Podkamennaya Tunguska River http://tinyurl.com/7u98eou
For Google Earth click here (you have to have google earth installed)

APOD: 2007 November 14 - Tunguska: The Largest Recent Impact Event:

Trees felled by the Tunguska explosion | Credit: the Leonid Kulik Expedition (1927)
Tunguska: The Largest Recent Impact Event
Credit: Leonid Kulik Expedition, Wikipedia

Explanation: Yes, but can your meteor do this? The most powerful natural explosion in recent Earth history occurred on 1908 June 30 when a meteor exploded above the Tunguska River in Siberia , Russia . Detonating with an estimated power 1,000 times greater than the atomic bomb dropped over Hiroshima , the Tunguska event leveled trees over 40 kilometers away and shook the ground in a tremendous earthquake. Eyewitness reports are astounding. The above picture was taken by a Russian expedition to the Tunguska site almost 20 years after the event, finding trees littering the ground like toothpicks. Estimates of the meteor's size range from 60 meters to over 1000 meters in diameter. Recent evidence suggests that nearby Lake Cheko may even have been created by the impact . Although a meteor the size of the Tunguska can level a city , metropolitan areas take up such a small fraction of the Earth's surface that a direct impact on one is relatively unlikely. More likely is an impact in the water near a city that creates a dangerous tsunami . One focus of modern astronomy is to find Solar System objects capable of creating such devastation well before they impact the Earth.

 
The Southern swamp—the hypocenter of the Tunguska explosion, in 2008

 

 

Documentary

Big Bang in Tunguska - Documentary on the mysterious 1908 event - Full
The Tunguska event, or Tunguska blast or Tunguska explosion, was an enormously powerful explosion that occurred near the Podkamennaya Tunguska River in what is now Krasnoyarsk Krai, Russia, at about 7:14 a.m. KRAT ( 0:14 UT) on June 30 [O.S. June 17, 1908.
The explosion is believed to have been caused by the air burst of a large meteoroid or comet fragment at an altitude of 5--10 kilometres (3--6 mi) above the Earth's surface. Different studies have yielded varying estimates of the object's size, with general agreement that it was a few tens of metres across.
The number of scholarly publications on the problem of the Tunguska explosion since 1908 may be estimated at about 1,000 (mainly in Russian). Many scientists have participated in Tunguska studies, the best-known of them being Leonid Kulik, Yevgeny Krinov, Kirill Florensky, Nikolai Vladimirovich Vasiliev and Wilhelm Fast.
Although the meteoroid or comet burst in the air rather than hitting the surface, this event is still referred to as an impact. Estimates of the energy of the blast range from 5 to as high as 30 megatons of TNT (21--130 PJ), with 10--15 megatons of TNT (42--63 PJ) the most likely—roughly equal to the United States' Castle Bravo thermonuclear bomb tested on March 1, 1954, about 1,000 times more powerful than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, and about one-third the power of the Tsar Bomba, the largest nuclear weapon ever detonated. The explosion knocked over an estimated 80 million trees covering 2,150 square kilometres (830 sq mi). It is estimated that the shock wave from the blast would have measured 5.0 on the Richter scale. An explosion of this magnitude is capable of destroying a large metropolitan area. This possibility has helped to spark discussion of asteroid deflection strategies.
The Tunguska event is the largest impact event over land in Earth's recent history. Impacts of similar size over remote ocean areas would most likely have gone unnoticed before the advent of global satellite monitoring in the 1960s and 1970s.


1908 Mystery Tunguska Russia (Documentary - Full)
George Carey uncovers the mystery behind the massive explosion that shook Tunguska, Siberia in 1908



The Tunguska Impact--100 Years Later http://science.nasa.gov/ science-news/science-at-nasa/ 2008/30jun_tunguska/
 

 
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