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Near-Earth-Objects Monitoring System


Latest Updates on Near-Earth-Objects
(NEO's)

Source:
NASA-NEO

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Earth Approaching Objects: Archive: 2011 | You are now here: 2012

 
     

Potentially Hazardous Asteroids (PHAs) are space rocks larger than approximately 100m that can come closer to Earth than 0.05 AU. None of the known PHAs is on a collision course with our planet, although astronomers are finding new ones all the time.

News & Observing Tips below updates


CLOSE APPROACHES & UPCOMING CLOSE APPROACHES TO EARTH 2012
1 AU = ~150 million kilometers
1 LD = Lunar Distance = ~384,000 kilometers


Object
Name
Close
Approach
Date
Miss
Distance
(AU)

Miss
Distance
(LD)
Estimated
Diameter*
H
(mag)
Relative
Velocity
(km/s)
Januari 2012
           
(2002 AB2)  2012-Jan-01 0.1479 57.5 67 m - 150 m 23.0 10.15
(2007 AM)  2012-Jan-01 0.1906 74.2 130 m - 280 m 21.6 11.36
(2007 BD)  2012-Jan-02 0.0935 36.4 20 m - 45 m 25.6 9.40
(2004 FG29)  2012-Jan-02 0.1932 75.2 19 m - 41 m 25.8 20.55
(2003 AF23)  2012-Jan-04 0.0361 14.1 200 m - 460 m 20.6 16.18
(2008 SA)  2012-Jan-06 0.0563 21.9 26 m - 58 m 25.0 6.63
(1999 LS7)  2012-Jan-06 0.1379 53.7 190 m - 430 m 20.7 11.90
(2011 XD)  2012-Jan-07 0.1092 42.5 44 m - 99 m 23.9 7.60
(2011 VO5)  2012-Jan-07 0.1954 76.0 120 m - 270 m 21.7 8.44
(2011 AC3)  2012-Jan-09 0.0765 29.8 89 m - 200 m 22.4 20.61
(2002 BF25)  2012-Jan-11 0.0677 26.3 82 m - 180 m 22.5 8.77
(2004 YD)  2012-Jan-12 0.1284 50.0 41 m - 92 m 24.1 8.45
(2005 BU)  2012-Jan-14 0.0517 20.1 13 m - 29 m 26.6 11.24
(2010 JK1)  2012-Jan-21 0.1644 64.0 35 m - 78 m 24.4 4.27
(2005 YO3)  2012-Jan-21 0.1265 49.2 25 m - 57 m 25.1 9.44
P/2006 T1 (Levy)  2012-Jan-21 0.1911 74.4 n/a 0.0 15.46
(2009 BO58)  2012-Jan-24 0.1795 69.8 110 m - 250 m 21.9 20.32
(2010 LN14)  2012-Jan-24 0.1500 58.4 160 m - 350 m 21.1 19.19
7341 (1991 VK)  2012-Jan-25 0.0650 25.3 1.2 km - 2.7 km 16.7 8.73
(2011 FC29)  2012-Jan-26 0.1720 67.0 170 m - 380 m 20.9 17.47
(2012 BX34) 2012-Jan-27 0.0004 0.2 7.9 m - 18 m 27.6 9.99
(2008 CL20)  2012-Jan-28 0.1168 45.4 23 m - 52 m 25.3 9.96
(2010 WU8)  2012-Jan-30 0.0776 30.2 39 m - 86 m 24.2 7.91
433 Eros  2012-Jan-31 0.1787 69.5 17 km 11.2 5.95
Februari 2012
           
(2008 EP6)  2012-Feb-01 0.0605 23.6 360 m - 790 m 19.4 12.72
278381 (2007 MR)  2012-Feb-01 0.0727 28.3 110 m - 250 m 21.9 8.58
(2006 SU217)  2012-Feb-01 0.0716 27.9 22 m - 49 m 25.4 7.36
(2006 CJ)  2012-Feb-01 0.0453 17.6 250 m - 560 m 20.1 21.89
(2006 AL8)  2012-Feb-01 0.1050 40.9 580 m - 1.3 km 18.3 36.73
(2011 CE50)  2012-Feb-10 0.1898 73.9 60 m - 130 m 23.2 8.85
(2009 DT10)  2012-Feb-11 0.0268 10.4 70 m - 160 m 22.9 14.16
(2008 CQ116)  2012-Feb-13 0.1446 56.3 50 m - 110 m 23.6 14.62
(2010 GR33)  2012-Feb-13 0.1119 43.6 75 m - 170 m 22.8 8.95
(2004 XG)  2012-Feb-14 0.1968 76.6 40 m - 89 m 24.1 14.23
(2008 QY)  2012-Feb-14 0.1531 59.6 540 m - 1.2 km 18.5 22.29
(2009 AV)  2012-Feb-16 0.1154 44.9 710 m - 1.6 km 17.9 24.01
(1993 DA)  2012-Feb-17 0.0410 16.0 14 m - 31 m 26.4 6.62
(2002 TZ66)  2012-Feb-18 0.1247 48.5 18 m - 39 m 25.9 5.59
162421 (2000 ET70)  2012-Feb-19 0.0454 17.7 630 m - 1.4 km 18.1 11.54
(2008 WZ13)  2012-Feb-21 0.1471 57.2 520 m - 1.2 km 18.5 10.49
(2011 CP4)  2012-Feb-23 0.0233 9.1 160 m - 350 m 21.2 30.47
(2007 RS1)  2012-Feb-24 0.1558 60.6 1.7 m - 3.8 m 31.0 16.01
(2008 BX2)  2012-Feb-25 0.1560 60.7 50 m - 110 m 23.6 7.66
(2010 RF12)  2012-Feb-26 0.0958 37.3 5.6 m - 13 m 28.4 8.00
(2003 QB30)  2012-Feb-28 0.1899 73.9 14 m - 32 m 26.4 17.69
(2002 QC7)  2012-Feb-28 0.0714 27.8 280 m - 630 m 19.9 15.17
(2012 BN11) 2012-Feb-29 0.1092 42.5 190 m - 430 m 20.7 13.00
2012 DW32) 2012-Feb-29 0.0356 13.8 24 m - 53 m 25.3 6.94
March 2012
           
(2012 DS32) 2012-Mar-01 0.0048 1.9 15 m - 33 m 26.3 9.32
(2012 DN31) 2012-Mar-01 0.0206 8.0 48 m - 110 m 23.7 7.65
(2009 FY4)  2012-Mar-02 0.1680 65.4 170 m - 380 m 21.0 17.83
(2012 DR32) 2012-Mar-02 0.0223 8.7 31 m - 70 m 24.6 16.21
(2008 CE119)  2012-Mar-03 0.0675 26.3 20 m - 44 m 25.7 4.69
(2000 DO1) 2012-Mar-03 0.1393 54.2 230 m - 510 m 20.3 26.88
(2012 EB) 2012-Mar-03 0.0439 17.1 48 m - 110 m 23.7 8.48
(2012 EA) 2012-Mar-03 0.0067 2.6 11 m - 25 m 26.9 5.16
(2012 DU60) 2012-Mar-03 0.0235 9.1 21 m - 48 m 25.5 8.32
(2012 DQ8) 2012-Mar-04 0.1139 44.3 150 m - 340 m 21.2 14.96
(2012 DZ13) 2012-Mar-04 0.0330 12.9 39 m - 87 m 24.2 12.45
(2012 DJ31) 2012-Mar-05 0.0343 13.3 37 m - 83 m 24.3 15.53
(2012 DK14) 2012-Mar-06 0.0871 33.9 45 m - 100 m 23.9 13.63
(2008 EJ85)  2012-Mar-06 0.0235 9.1 27 m - 60 m 25.0 6.52
(2011 EC12)  2012-Mar-09 0.0948 36.9 18 m - 41 m 25.8 12.91
(2012 DP32) 2012-Mar-10 0.0362 14.1 35 m - 79 m 24.4 8.84
(2012 DH54) 2012-Mar-10 0.0086 3.4 7.9 m - 18 m 27.6 4.78
(2012 DF31) 2012-Mar-10 0.0548 21.3 34 m - 76 m 24.5 13.76
(2011 UU106)  2012-Mar-11 0.1737 67.6 500 m - 1.1 km 18.6 8.81
(2012 DN14)  2012-Mar-12 0.0695 27.1 33 m - 73 m 24.6 4.31
(2012 DW60)  2012-Mar-12 0.0064 2.5 15 m - 33 m 26.3 5.66
(2012 BK11)  2012-Mar-12 0.1750 68.1 72 m - 160 m 22.8 3.03
(2010 SV3)  2012-Mar-12 0.0577 22.5 200 m - 450 m 20.6 15.34
(2010 XA11)  2012-Mar-12 0.1676 65.2 16 m - 36 m 26.1 7.87
(2010 CO1)  2012-Mar-12 0.1132 44.1 130 m - 290 m 21.5 13.73
192642 (1999 RD32) 2012-Mar-14 0.1488 57.9 1.5 km - 3.3 km 16.3 18.80
(2008 EY5)  2012-Mar-14 0.0882 34.3 260 m - 570 m 20.1 11.99
(2012 BB14)  2012-Mar-15 0.0483 18.8 27 m - 60 m 25.0 2.10
(2011 YU62)  2012-Mar-16 0.1885 73.4 830 m - 1.8 km 17.5 17.85
(2010 FN)  2012-Mar-19 0.1438 56.0 13 m - 28 m 26.6 11.18
(2012 BT23)  2012-Mar-20 0.1239 48.2 420 m - 940 m 19.0 13.11
(2012 DO8)  2012-Mar-20 0.1757 68.4 100 m - 220 m 22.1 7.27
(2012 DH4)  2012-Mar-21 0.0607 23.6 190 m - 430 m 20.7 15.56
(2011 SY120) 2012-Mar-21 0.0517 20.1 65 m - 150 m 23.1 17.55
(2001 QJ142)  2012-Mar-22 0.1909 74.3 55 m - 120 m 23.4 8.46
(2010 FR9)  2012-Mar-22 0.0479 18.6 16 m - 35 m 26.1 8.66
(2012 BS23)  2012-Mar-23 0.1580 61.5 140 m - 310 m 21.4 11.05
(2012 DW30)  2012-Mar-24 0.1190 46.3 78 m - 170 m 22.7 5.04
(2012 DO) 2012-Mar-25 0.1061 41.3 240 m - 530 m 20.2 7.60
152754 (1999 GS6)  2012-Mar-26 0.1118 43.5 340 m - 760 m 19.5 11.71
(2011 GB55)  2012-Mar-27 0.1114 43.4 130 m - 280 m 21.6 16.14
(2012 FE) 2012-Mar-27 0.0318 12.4 10 m - 23 m 27.0 6.95
(2002 EW8)  2012-Mar-28 0.1996 77.7 53 m - 120 m 23.5 13.67
(2012 FX23)   2012-Mar-28 0.0571 22.2 15 m - 34 m 26.2 9.27
(2012 EM8) 2012-Mar-30 0.0466 18.1 31 m - 70 m 24.7 4.07
(2012 FV23) 2012-Mar-30 0.0170 6.6 22 m - 50 m 25.4 6.19
(2012 CA55)  2012-Mar-30 0.0566 22.0 120 m - 270 m 21.8 9.26
(2008 GD)  2012-Mar-30 0.1687 65.6 300 m - 670 m 19.7 32.35
(2009 TP)  2012-Mar-31 0.1157 45.0 52 m - 120 m 23.5 3.72
(1992 JD)  2012-May-02 0.0243 9.5 26 m - 59 m 25.0 6.98
April 2012
           
(2012 EG5)  2012-Apr-01 0.0015 0.6 37 m - 83 m 24.3 8.54
(2008 CH70)  2012-Apr-01 0.0872 33.9 34 m - 77 m 24.4 9.06
(2012 FW35)  2012-Apr-01 0.0214 8.3 14 m - 32 m 26.4 12.25
(2012 FC1)  2012-Apr-02 0.1109 43.2 31 m - 69 m 24.7 8.10
(2012 FQ62)  2012-Apr-02 0.0145 5.7 19 m - 43 m 25.7 22.02
(2012 FS52)  2012-Apr-02 0.0228 8.9 27 m - 61 m 24.9 16.65
(2012 FW23)  2012-Apr-02 0.1281 49.8 32 m - 72 m 24.6 6.04
(2011 FQ6)  2012-Apr-03 0.1784 69.4 7.5 m - 17 m 27.7 6.89
(2010 GD35)  2012-Apr-03 0.0630 24.5 33 m - 73 m 24.5 10.64
(2012 FH58)  2012-Apr-03 0.0094 3.6 10 m - 23 m 27.0 9.84
(2012 AA11)  2012-Apr-03 0.0729 28.4 260 m - 580 m 20.0 8.51
(2012 FR35)  2012-Apr-04 0.1904 74.1 120 m - 280 m 21.7 8.91
(2012 EW14)  2012-Apr-04 0.1840 71.6 110 m - 240 m 22.0 12.81
(2012 FA57)  2012-Apr-04 0.0029 1.1 18 m - 39 m 25.9 9.24
(2004 TB10)  2012-Apr-05 0.0967 37.6 150 m - 330 m 21.2 12.42
(2007 WU3)  2012-Apr-06 0.1831 71.3 56 m - 120 m 23.4 6.28
(2012 DX75)  2012-Apr-06 0.0603 23.5 230 m - 520 m 20.3 12.87
(2010 GE30)  2012-Apr-06 0.1437 55.9 50 m - 110 m 23.6 4.71
(2003 UD22)  2012-Apr-06 0.1711 66.6 320 m - 720 m 19.6 12.91
(1995 DW1)  2012-Apr-07 0.1712 66.6 160 m - 360 m 21.1 12.85
(2008 GG2)  2012-Apr-10 0.1445 56.2 78 m - 170 m 22.7 7.16
(2007 HC)  2012-Apr-10 0.1813 70.6 24 m - 53 m 25.2 11.34
(2009 HE60)  2012-Apr-10 0.1096 42.7 20 m - 44 m 25.7 4.71
(2004 FG11)  2012-Apr-10 0.0574 22.3 180 m - 390 m 20.9 25.09
(2006 UE17)  2012-Apr-12 0.1375 53.5 110 m - 250 m 21.9 8.99
(2012 EO10)  2012-Apr-12 0.0815 31.7 33 m - 75 m 24.5 6.57
(2004 RQ252)  2012-Apr-12 0.0441 17.2 90 m - 200 m 22.3 10.71
319988 (2007 DK)  2012-Apr-13 0.1735 67.5 370 m - 830 m 19.3 12.73
(2012 FO35)  2012-Apr-13 0.0568 22.1 50 m - 110 m 23.6 14.91
(2003 GQ22)  2012-Apr-14 0.1179 45.9 170 m - 380 m 21.0 10.48
(2012 FE58)  2012-Apr-15 0.1656 64.4 180 m - 400 m 20.9 5.98
(2009 WD106)  2012-Apr-15 0.1927 75.0 500 m - 1.1 km 18.6 25.20
(2012 ES14)  2012-Apr-18 0.1863 72.5 240 m - 540 m 20.2 17.75
297274 (1996 SK)  2012-Apr-18 0.1726 67.2 1.0 km - 2.2 km 17.1 19.26
(2012 FD23)  2012-Apr-18 0.1005 39.1 260 m - 590 m 20.0 14.17
(2007 HV4)  2012-Apr-19 0.0122 4.8 4.9 m - 11 m 28.7 8.98
(2010 HW20)  2012-Apr-19 0.1549 60.3 16 m - 36 m 26.1 6.74
(2008 AF3)  2012-Apr-19 0.1957 76.2 14 m - 31 m 26.4 1.72
141018 (2001 WC47)  2012-Apr-19 0.1013 39.4 510 m - 1.1 km 18.6 3.80
(2011 UP63)  2012-Apr-20 0.1283 49.9 48 m - 110 m 23.7 5.83
(2010 WR7)  2012-Apr-21 0.1834 71.4 52 m - 120 m 23.5 6.52
(2009 HU44)  2012-Apr-21 0.0872 33.9 84 m - 190 m 22.5 21.17
(2012 FY23)  2012-Apr-22 0.0852 33.1 260 m - 590 m 20.0 14.00
(2011 UD21)  2012-Apr-22 0.0547 21.3 5.3 m - 12 m 28.5 1.46
(2008 TZ3)  2012-Apr-23 0.1673 65.1 230 m - 510 m 20.3 13.31
(2003 WH166)  2012-Apr-23 0.0509 19.8 110 m - 250 m 21.9 13.49
(2012 FG58)  2012-Apr-23 0.0653 25.4 110 m - 240 m 22.0 13.57
(2006 VQ13)  2012-Apr-24 0.1395 54.3 260 m - 580 m 20.0 15.47
(2012 AP10)  2012-Apr-24 0.1481 57.6 14 m - 31 m 26.4 2.08
(2009 UW18)  2012-Apr-28 0.1355 52.7 320 m - 720 m 19.6 14.22
(2011 WV134)  2012-Apr-28 0.0992 38.6 1.0 km - 2.3 km 17.0 12.12
(2008 UC202)  2012-Apr-29 0.0263 10.2 6.0 m - 13 m 28.2 4.55
(2009 TP)  2012-Apr-30 0.1177 45.8 52 m - 120 m 23.5 3.13
(2012 HE31)  2012-Apr-30 0.0070 2.7 19 m - 43 m 25.7 10.46
(2012 HO13)  2012-Apr-30 0.1966 76.5 59 m - 130 m 23.3 18.80
(2004 MD)  2012-Apr-30 0.1679 65.3 250 m - 560 m 20.1 10.24
May 2012
           
(1992 JD)  2012-May-02 0.0243 9.5 26 m - 59 m 25.0 6.98
(2001 SZ269)  2012-May-02 0.0807 31.4 360 m - 810 m 19.3 18.37
(2012 HA34)  2012-May-02 0.0074 2.9 23 m - 52 m 25.3 11.87
(2012 FD1)  2012-May-03 0.0855 33.3 76 m - 170 m 22.7 7.35
(2012 HO1)  2012-May-04 0.1417 55.2 55 m - 120 m 23.4 6.11
(2010 KX7)  2012-May-04 0.0390 15.2 110 m - 260 m 21.8 11.42
(2011 JN5)  2012-May-05 0.1107 43.1 25 m - 55 m 25.2 17.81
(2012 HL)  2012-May-07 0.0539 21.0 82 m - 180 m 22.6 9.44
(2012 HM8)  2012-May-09 0.0362 14.1 44 m - 98 m 23.9 8.85
(2012 GB5)  2012-May-09 0.0581 22.6 50 m - 110 m 23.6 11.18
(1998 HE3)  2012-May-10 0.0319 12.4 120 m - 270 m 21.7 11.93
(2005 SQ9)  2012-May-11 0.0852 33.2 68 m - 150 m 22.9 10.21
(2012 HB25)  2012-May-11 0.0285 11.1 29 m - 66 m 24.8 10.56
141432 (2002 CQ11)  2012-May-12 0.1022 39.8 280 m - 630 m 19.9 16.26
(2008 CB6)  2012-May-13 0.1103 42.9 10 m - 23 m 27.1 10.85
(2010 SO16)  2012-May-13 0.1423 55.4 200 m - 460 m 20.6 9.53
(2001 QN142)  2012-May-15 0.1915 74.5 140 m - 310 m 21.4 13.43
(2012 GK)  2012-May-15 0.0564 21.9 91 m - 200 m 22.3 8.28
(2011 KY15)  2012-May-15 0.1586 61.7 41 m - 93 m 24.0 17.61
(2012 HN13)  2012-May-15 0.0823 32.0 70 m - 160 m 22.9 8.02
(2012 HC20)  2012-May-18 0.1226 47.7 130 m - 290 m 21.6 16.84
(2001 BA16)  2012-May-18 0.1157 45.0 18 m - 41 m 25.8 6.66
(2010 KK37)  2012-May-19 0.0058 2.3 19 m - 43 m 25.7 10.94
4183 Cuno  2012-May-20 0.1218 47.4 3.5 km - 7.8 km 14.4 14.40
(2006 KY67)  2012-May-23 0.1499 58.3 68 m - 150 m 23.0 13.88
(2011 KG4)  2012-May-24 0.1216 47.3 67 m - 150 m 23.0 11.50
(2012 HZ33)  2012-May-24 0.1591 61.9 250 m - 570 m 20.1 12.81
(2002 KM3)  2012-May-24 0.1845 71.8 90 m - 200 m 22.4 15.67
(1994 NK)  2012-May-24 0.1186 46.2 270 m - 610 m 19.9 6.87
(2012 HL8)  2012-May-25 0.1311 51.0 49 m - 110 m 23.7 6.63
154330 (2002 VX94)  2012-May-26 0.1869 72.8 670 m - 1.5 km 18.0 13.62
(2002 AW)  2012-May-26 0.1924 74.9 210 m - 460 m 20.6 6.95
(2012 KT42) 2012-May-29 0.0001 0.05 4.4 m - 9.8 m 28.9 17.04
(2001 CQ36) 2012-May-30 0.0258 10.0 77 m - 170 m 22.7 5.62
(2002 OA22) 2012-May-31 0.1197 46.6 360 m - 820 m 19.3 7.01
             
             
             
June 2012
(2007 LE) 2012-Jun-02 0.0478 18.6 400 m - 890 m 19.1 19.77
(2012 HK31)  2012-Jun-05 0.0350 13.6 20 m - 45 m 25.6 2.87
(2008 MG1)  2012-Jun-05 0.1268 49.3 290 m - 640 m 19.8 22.32
(2009 LE)  2012-Jun-06 0.1150 44.8 50 m - 110 m 23.6 13.61
(2006 SG7)  2012-Jun-06 0.0857 33.4 71 m - 160 m 22.9 16.47
(2001 LB)  2012-Jun-07 0.0729 28.4 200 m - 440 m 20.7 11.56
(2012 JU11)  2012-Jun-09 0.0737 28.7 27 m - 59 m 25.0 3.81
(2012 GX11)  2012-Jun-10 0.1556 60.5 170 m - 380 m 21.0 6.38
(2012 KM11)  2012-Jun-14 0.0942 36.7 30 m - 67 m 24.7 5.92
(2012 HN40)  2012-Jun-15 0.1182 46.0 230 m - 510 m 20.3 13.79
(2002 AC)  2012-Jun-16 0.1598 62.2 740 m - 1.7 km 17.8 26.71
137120 (1999 BJ8)  2012-Jun-16 0.1769 68.8 670 m - 1.5 km 18.0 14.88
(2011 KR12)  2012-Jun-19 0.1318 51.3 140 m - 310 m 21.4 10.10
(2004 HB39)  2012-Jun-20 0.1605 62.5 77 m - 170 m 22.7 8.88
(2008 CE119)  2012-Jun-21 0.1811 70.5 21 m - 46 m 25.5 3.22
308242 (2005 GO21)  2012-Jun-21 0.0440 17.1 1.4 km - 3.1 km 16.4 13.27
(2011 AH5)  2012-Jun-25 0.1670 65.0 17 m - 39 m 25.9 5.84
(2012 FA14)  2012-Jun-25 0.0322 12.5 75 m - 170 m 22.7 5.28
(2004 YG1)  2012-Jun-25 0.0890 34.7 140 m - 310 m 21.4 11.34
(2010 AF3)  2012-Jun-25 0.1190 46.3 16 m - 36 m 26.1 6.54
(2008 YT30)  2012-Jun-26 0.0715 27.8 370 m - 820 m 19.3 10.70
(2010 NY65)  2012-Jun-27 0.1023 39.8 120 m - 270 m 21.7 15.09
(2008 WM64)  2012-Jun-28 0.1449 56.4 200 m - 440 m 20.6 17.31
(2010 CD55)  2012-Jun-28 0.1975 76.8 64 m - 140 m 23.1 6.33
(2004 CL)  2012-Jun-30 0.1113 43.3 220 m - 480 m 20.5 20.75
July 2012
           
(2008 YQ2)  2012-Jul-03 0.1057 41.1 29 m - 65 m 24.8 15.60
(2012 KM45)  2012-Jul-05 0.1018 39.6 510 m - 1.1 km 18.6 20.10
(2005 QQ30)  2012-Jul-06 0.1765 68.7 280 m - 620 m 19.9 13.13
(2011 YJ28)  2012-Jul-06 0.1383 53.8 150 m - 330 m 21.3 14.19
276392 (2002 XH4)  2012-Jul-07 0.1851 72.0 370 m - 840 m 19.3 7.76
(2003 MK4)  2012-Jul-08 0.1673 65.1 180 m - 410 m 20.8 14.35
(1999 NW2)  2012-Jul-08 0.0853 33.2 62 m - 140 m 23.1 6.66
189P/NEAT  2012-Jul-09 0.1720 66.9 n/a 0.0 12.47
(2000 JB6)  2012-Jul-10 0.1780 69.3 490 m - 1.1 km 18.7 6.42
(2010 MJ1)  2012-Jul-10 0.1533 59.7 52 m - 120 m 23.6 10.35
(2012 KF47)  2012-Jul-11 0.1713 66.7 180 m - 400 m 20.8 10.57
(2008 NP3)  2012-Jul-12 0.1572 61.2 57 m - 130 m 23.3 6.08
(2006 BV39)  2012-Jul-12 0.1132 44.1 4.2 m - 9.5 m 29.0 11.11
(2005 NE21)  2012-Jul-15 0.1555 60.5 140 m - 320 m 21.3 10.77
(2003 KU2)  2012-Jul-15 0.1034 40.2 770 m - 1.7 km 17.7 17.12
(2007 TN74)  2012-Jul-16 0.1718 66.9 20 m - 45 m 25.6 7.36
(2007 DD)  2012-Jul-16 0.1101 42.8 19 m - 42 m 25.8 6.47
(2006 BC8)  2012-Jul-16 0.1584 61.6 25 m - 56 m 25.1 17.71
144411 (2004 EW9)  2012-Jul-16 0.1202 46.8 1.3 km - 2.9 km 16.5 10.90
(2012 BV26)  2012-Jul-18 0.1759 68.4 90 m - 200 m 22.4 10.88
(2010 OB101)  2012-Jul-19 0.1196 46.6 200 m - 450 m 20.6 13.34
(2008 OX1)  2012-Jul-20 0.1873 72.9 130 m - 300 m 21.5 15.35
(2010 GK65)  2012-Jul-21 0.1696 66.0 34 m - 75 m 24.5 17.80
(2011 OJ45)  2012-Jul-21 0.1367 53.2 18 m - 39 m 25.9 3.79
153958 (2002 AM31)  2012-Jul-22 0.0351 13.7 620 m - 1.4 km 18.1 9.55
(2011 CA7)  2012-Jul-23 0.1492 58.1 2.3 m - 5.1 m 30.3 5.43
(2012 BB124)  2012-Jul-24 0.1610 62.7 170 m - 380 m 21.0 8.78
(2009 PC)  2012-Jul-28 0.1772 68.9 61 m - 140 m 23.2 7.34
217013 (2001 AA50)  2012-Jul-31 0.1355 52.7 580 m - 1.3 km 18.3 22.15
August 2012
           
(2012 DS30)  2012-Aug-02 0.1224 47.6 18 m - 39 m 25.9 5.39
(2000 RN77)  2012-Aug-03 0.1955 76.1 410 m - 920 m 19.0 9.87
(2004 SB56)  2012-Aug-04 0.1393 54.2 380 m - 840 m 19.2 13.72
(2000 SD8)  2012-Aug-04 0.1675 65.2 180 m - 400 m 20.9 5.82
(2006 EC)  2012-Aug-06 0.0932 36.3 13 m - 28 m 26.6 6.13
(2006 MV1)  2012-Aug-07 0.0612 23.8 12 m - 28 m 26.7 4.79
(2005 RK3)  2012-Aug-08 0.1843 71.7 52 m - 120 m 23.6 8.27
(2009 BW2)  2012-Aug-09 0.0337 13.1 25 m - 56 m 25.1 5.27
277475 (2005 WK4)  2012-Aug-09 0.1283 49.9 260 m - 580 m 20.1 6.18
(2004 SC56)  2012-Aug-09 0.0811 31.6 74 m - 170 m 22.8 10.57
(2008 AF4)  2012-Aug-10 0.1936 75.3 310 m - 690 m 19.7 16.05
37655 Illapa  2012-Aug-12 0.0951 37.0 770 m - 1.7 km 17.7 28.73
(2012 HS15)  2012-Aug-14 0.1804 70.2 220 m - 480 m 20.4 11.54
4581 Asclepius  2012-Aug-16 0.1079 42.0 220 m - 490 m 20.4 13.48
(2008 TC4)  2012-Aug-18 0.1937 75.4 140 m - 300 m 21.5 17.34
(2006 CV)  2012-Aug-20 0.1744 67.9 290 m - 640 m 19.8 13.24
(2012 EC)  2012-Aug-20 0.0815 31.7 56 m - 130 m 23.4 5.57
162421 (2000 ET70)  2012-Aug-21 0.1503 58.5 640 m - 1.4 km 18.1 12.92
(2007 WU3)  2012-Aug-21 0.1954 76.0 56 m - 120 m 23.4 5.25
(2012 BB14)  2012-Aug-24 0.1234 48.0 27 m - 60 m 25.0 2.58
(2012 FM52)  2012-Aug-25 0.0599 23.3 510 m - 1.1 km 18.6 17.17
66146 (1998 TU3)  2012-Aug-25 0.1265 49.2 3.0 km - 6.8 km 14.7 16.03
(2009 AV)  2012-Aug-26 0.1615 62.8 680 m - 1.5 km 18.0 22.51
(2003 BQ35)  2012-Aug-28 0.1585 61.7 210 m - 470 m 20.5 4.64
(2010 SC)  2012-Aug-28 0.1679 65.3 16 m - 36 m 26.1 9.56
4769 Castalia  2012-Aug-28 0.1135 44.2 1.4 km 16.9 12.06
September 2012
           
(2012 FS35)  2012-Sep-02 0.1545 60.1 2.3 m - 5.2 m 30.3 2.87
(2012 HG31)  2012-Sep-03 0.0716 27.9 450 m - 1.0 km 18.9 10.33
(2012 EH5)  2012-Sep-05 0.1613 62.8 38 m - 84 m 24.2 9.75



* Diameter estimates based on the object's absolute magnitude .

News & Observing Tips 2012
Asteroid Threat to Earth Sparks Global 'NEOShield' Project

Also read:

* Planet viewing: Tips & Information
* Observing the Sun and Planets & Anomalies Explained
* NASA Blogs (on above listed near approaches and sightings)

Images
ASTEROID IMAGES COMET IMAGES
1999 AN10
1999 JM8
Braille
Eros
Gaspra
Geographos
Ida & Dactyl
Mathilde
Toutatis
Vesta
Comet Borrelly
Comet d'Arrest
Comet Encke
Comet Hale-Bopp
Comet Halley
Comet Hyakutake
Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9
Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3
Comet Wirtanen
CRATER/IMPACT PHOTOS METEORITE PHOTOS
Meteor Crater (Arizona)
Chicxulub Crater (Yucatan, Mexico)
Aorounga Crater (Chad)
Manicouagan Crater (Canada)
Roter Kamm Crater (Namibia)
Comet SL9 Impacts On Jupiter
Impact Crater Chains On Callisto
Impact Crater Chains On Ganymede
Impact Crater Chain On The Moon
Mars Meteorites
Meteorite Slideset
METEOR SHOWER PHOTOS ANIMATIONS & MOVIES
2001 Leonids
1999 Perseids
1998 Leonids
1997 Perseids
Keeping An Eye on Space Rocks
"Awesome Asteroids"
"Cool Comets"
 


 
2040: Asteroid 2011 AG5 Could Pose Threat to Earth in 2040

 


2013: Asteroid 2012 DA14


June 15 2012

UPDATE: Researchers anticipate that asteroid 2011 AG5, discovered in January 2011, will fly safely past and not impact Earth in 2040

To read the workshop report and findings, visit: http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/
For information about NASA asteroid missions and activities, visit: http://www.nasa.gov/asteroids

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Asteroid 2012 DA14 February 15 2013 impact?
Asteroid 2012 DA14 on February 15 2013 (Distance only 27.000 kilometers, 82 meters .. Impact?)
2005 YU55 (November 2011) distance: 325 000 kilometers
2012 DA14 (February 2013) distance: 26 900 kilometers

Asteroid 2012 DA14| Credit: Spaceobs.org

News Stories

Blast it or paint it: Asteroid to threaten Earth in 2013 - To avert a possible catastrophe – this time set for February 2013 – scientists suggest confronting asteroid 2012 DA14 with either paint or big guns. The stickler is that time has long run out to build a spaceship to carry out the operation. http://rt.com/news/ paint-asteroid-earth-nasa-7 67/

Asteroid 2012 DA14 heads for Earth next year - possible impact? http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/320607

Tunguska-Sized Asteroid Homing on Earth
http://en.rian.ru/science/ 20120226/171543660.html

Armageddon Online - ... Nope! Asteroid 2012 DA14 will not hit us ... http://www.armageddononline.org/asteroid-2012-DA14-won-t-hit-Earth.html

Discovered Asteroid that Will Fly Very Closer to Earth Next Year
Read more:
http://forcetoknow.com/category/space/asteroids#ixzz1oE8fNMpl

Has NASA confirmed the collision with Asteroid 2012 DA14 at February 15, 2013? http://hainanwel.com/en/ unusual-world/ 1565-asteroid-2012-da-14.ht ml

NASA


2012 DA14 Earth Impact Risk Summary http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/ risk/2012da14.html

Images of Asteroid 2012 DA14

Image of asteroid 2012 DA 14: http://spaceobs.org/ wp-content/uploads/2012/02/ 2012DA14-20120228.png

More search results

NEWS

Asteroid 2012 DA14 on February 15 2013 Close Encounter With Earth


Read Full Story: http://www.cosmostv.org/2012/03/russia-asteroid-2012-da14-en-route.html

 

 

April 2012
April 22 2012

METEOR SHOWER RECAP: According to the International Meteor Organization, the Lyrid meteor shower peaked on April 22nd around 0000 UT with a maximum between 20 and 30 meteors per hour. This doesn't place the Lyrids among the year's best showers, but many observers were pleasantly surprised. "This year's Lyrid shower was much better than I expected! I saw dozens of meteors, mostly Lyrids, nice and quick ones," reports Monika Landy-Gyebnar, who caught this Lyrid over the glow of her hometown Veszprem, Hungary:

The meteors were serenaded by nightingales. "The birds arrived here about a week ago and they were constantly singing , which made the observation even more memorable!" she adds. "Imagine being out at night, surrounded by nightingales, with a bright Milky Way and meteors falling through our atmosphere - a wonderful celebration of Earth Day in 2012 which coincided with the Lyrid maximum!"

more images: from Pete Lawrence of Selsey, West Sussex, UK; from Shawn Malone near Marquette, Michigan; from Jimmy Westlake of Stagecoach, Colorado; from Darren Baskill of East Sussex, UK; from Brian Emfinger of Ozark, Arkansas; from Ivan Majchrovic of Marianka, Slovakia; from Peter Meadows of Chelmsford, Essex, UK; from Ireneusz Nowak of Wroclaw, Poland; from Michael Noble of Alberta, Canada;


Event into space in USA on Sunday, 22 April, 2012 at 17:58 (05:58 PM) UTC.

A large boom was heard Sunday morning around 8:00am around Northern Nevada and the Sierra. Washoe County Sheriff's Dispatchers tell News 4 they have received calls from “everywhere” including the Reno metro area to as far away as Incline Village. The Sheriff's Office says they are tying to find the source of the boom, but do not know what caused the boom. There have been reports of the boom being heard in the Reno-Sparks area, Carson City, Minden, South Lake Tahoe, Placerville and Truckee. A number of people in the Sierra around El Dorado County have reported they saw what they believed to be a meteor just before the sound. The El Dorado County Sheriff's Office tells News 4 they cannot confirm anything landed in their jurisdiction, but do tell us they have received a number of phone calls regarding the incident. Earth is experiencing a Lyrid meteor shower, it's peak was expected to be in the overnight hours. Some people had reported to News 4 and other media of a possible local impact. News 4 has reached-out to a number of local law enforcement agencies, state agencies and federal agencies looking for exact answers on what happened this morning. No agency has given us a definitive answer. Source

Situation Update No. 1 on Sunday, 22 April, 2012 at 18:18 UTC
People in Northern California and Nevada reported hearing a loud boom in the sky above the Sierra Sunday morning. The Tuolumne County sheriff's department said they are investigating the possibility that it might have been the physical impact of an overnight meteor shower. Some people in the Tahoe area said they saw what they believed to be a meteor just prior to the sound. People who live in in Lake Tahoe, El Dorado County, Placer County, Tuolumne County, Amador County and Nevada County contacted our sister station in Sacramento. KCRA is reporting that they heard the sound just after 8:30 a.m. A television station in Reno said they received similar calls from the city of Reno and as far away as Incline Village. Meteorologists in California and Nevada including our own Rob Mayeda said there were meteor showers Saturday night that could have still been going on Sunday morning. If the boom was a signal that an outer space rock made it way through the atmosphere, then there could be a rock or rocks now on Terra Firma. So far, no one has called authorities or television stations to report "a hit."

Mayeda said the meteor would likely be a bolide rock and that it likely burned up before getting to the ground. Every year the Earth passes through the orbit of a comet causing the Lyrid meteor shower. The results on a clear night is a meteor shower, which comes in the form of shooting stars streaking across the night sky. The stars are actually debris from the comet as it enters the Earth's atmosphere. According to the International Meteor Organization, the Lyrid meteor shower peaked with a maximum between 20 and 30 meteors per hour. That is not the best of the year's meteor showers, but many observers said they were pleasantly surprised. There was also a reported meteor streak in the South Bay Sunday morning at 7:50 a.m. Don Hirschfeld said he was at the Capitol Flea market when he saw a brilliant green streak race across the San Jose sky in the northeast direction. Hirshfeld said it lasted just a few seconds, but caught bargain shoppers' attention. There was no boom in the San Jose event and the streak ended with burn up flashes. http://hisz.rsoe.hu/ alertmap/site/ ?pageid=event_update_read&e dis_id=CO-20120422-34979-U SA&uid=12561

Situation Update No. 2 on Monday, 23 April, 2012 at 02:40 UTC
A loud explosion heard across much of Nevada and California on Sunday morning rattled homes and prompted a flood of calls to law enforcement agencies on both sides of the Sierra Nevada, some reporting fireball sightings. The sound and the light show were likely caused by a meteor that entered Earth's atmosphere, astronomers said. "It made the shades in my room shake hard enough to slam into the window a couple times," said Nicole Carlsen of the Reno area. "I kept looking for earthquake information, but (there was) nothing. I even checked the front of my house to make sure no one ran into the garage. I wish I had seen the meteor." Erin Girard-Hudson of Arnold, Calif., told The Union Democrat of Sonora, Calif., that the loud boom that occurred around 8 a.m. made her 2-year-old daughter, Elsie, cry. "It knocked me off my feet and was shaking the house," she said. "It sounded like it was next door." No damages or injuries were immediately reported. There were no reports of earthquakes at the time. Some people reported seeing a brilliant light streak across the sky at the same time. Sightings occurred over roughly a 600-mile line across the two states, including Reno, Elko and North Las Vegas in Nevada, and the San Francisco, Sacramento and Bakersfield areas in California.

Astronomers said they believe the mysterious light was a fireball, which is a very bright meteor. It will take time to determine the path of the fireball and where it broke up, they added. "From the reports, I have no doubt it was a fireball," said Robert Lunsford of the Geneseo, N.Y.-based American Meteor Society. "It happens all the time, but most are in daytime and are missed. This one was extraordinarily bright in the daylight." Lunsford said it's "pretty rare" for fireballs to produce a loud explosion. For that to happen, he explained, the meteor must have survived intact until breaking up about five miles above Earth. Most fireballs are visible at 50 miles above Earth. "If you hear a sonic boom or loud explosion, that's a good indication that some fragments may have reached the ground," Lunsford told The Associated Press. "We'll have to get some people to work on it to pinpoint where it broke up and see if anything can be found on the ground." Lunsford said more than 20 people in the two states had filed reports with his group by midmorning about seeing the fireball.

"I have been looking at the sky for 30 years, and I have never witnessed something so amazing and puzzling. It is an event that makes you glad to be alive," said Matthew Neal of San Francisco. "The main body was bright green and the head was bright red and white." Greg Giroux of June Lake, Calif., located along the eastern Sierra just west of Yosemite National Park, also was impressed. "This was by far the brightest fireball/shooting star I've ever seen, especially since it was in full sunlight," he said. "After the flash, it broke up into pieces, then I lost sight of it as it went behind a mountain." In Nevada, the light show was seen as far east as Elko, about 300 miles east of Reno, and as far south as the Las Vegas area. Marcia Standifer of Spring Creek, near Elko, and her husband were out drinking coffee when they saw the fireball at the same time. "It was a very bright ball of white light, then dimmer to the horizon," she said. "We thought this was very unusual due to the bright daylight and how vivid the object was." Tracey Cordaro of North Las Vegas said the sighting "took my breath away." "It was amazing," she said. "It looked as if it was disintegrating rapidly, but was still quite large when it disappeared from my view ... (It was) bright green, visible in the bright sunlight."

Dan Ruby, associate director of the Fleischmann Planetarium at the University of Nevada, Reno, said it's unlikely the fireball had anything to do with the current peak of the Lyrid meteor shower. "People are putting two and two together and saying it has something to do with the meteor shower," he said. "But the fireball was probably coincidental and unrelated to the peak of the meteor shower." Though the fireball was seen over such a wide area, Ruby said it was likely just "a little bigger than a washing machine." http://hisz.rsoe.hu/ alertmap/site/ ?pageid=event_update_read&e dis_id=CO-20120422-34979-U SA&uid=12562

Situation Update No. 3 on Tuesday, 24 April, 2012 at 02:48 UTC
A fiery meteor created a thundering explosion and traced a rare daylight fireball seen for about 600 miles across Nevada and California on Sunday, before apparently breaking up harmlessly at high altitude, astronomers said. NASA researchers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory said the midair explosion, centered over California's Central Valley east of the San Francisco Bay area, was the equivalent of the detonation of about 3.8 kilotons of TNT—about one quarter the energy released by the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945. "The meteor was probably about the size of an SUV," said Donald Yeomans, manager of NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office at the laboratory, in Pasadena, Calif. "This was a big one. An event of this size might happen about once a year, but most of them occur over the ocean or an uninhabited area." There were no reports Monday that any fragments of the object had reached the ground or caused any damage. No major telescope in the region tracked the early-morning fireball. NASA astronomers said the explosion might have been five to 10 miles high, which was high enough to let the sound spread widely.

Each day, countless meteors reach Earth's atmosphere. Most are smaller than a grain of sand, according to the American Meteor Society, and usually burn up before they hit Earth's surface. Sunday's eye-catching event occurred at the height of the annual Lyrid meteor shower, which happens every April as Earth plows through the dust and debris trailing a comet called Thatcher. People have been observing its annual shower of shooting stars for more than 2,600 years. Astronomers usually expect about 20 meteors per hour during the Lyrid shower, with outbursts as high as 100 meteors per hour. Generally, comet debris can hit Earth's atmosphere at speeds as fast as 110,000 miles per hour. The heat from the friction of its descent into the denser air can ignite the dust and debris in a display of astronomical fireworks. Skywatchers have reported dazzling fireballs, like Sunday's, during Lyrid showers in previous years. In the far distant past, immense meteorites—meteors that slam into Earth—likely contributed to the demise of the dinosaurs. The largest meteorite found weighs nearly 60 tons. Called Hoba, it is an iron boulder thought to have landed about 80,000 years ago, in present-day Namibia. On rare occasions, the falling bits of space debris do hit now-populated areas. There is no record of anyone ever having been killed by a meteorite, but in recent years, there have been verified accounts of a meteorite hitting a bedroom in Alabama, a dining room in Connecticut and a parked car in Peekskill, N.Y. http://hisz.rsoe.hu/ alertmap/site/ ?pageid=event_update_read&e dis_id=CO-20120422-34979-U SA&uid=12567

UPDATE:
SIERRA FIREBALL DECODED:
On Sunday morning, April 22nd, just as the Lyrid meteor shower was dying down, a spectacular fireball exploded over California's Sierra Nevada mountain range. The loud explosion rattled homes from central California to Reno, Nevada, and beyond. According to Bill Cooke, head of NASA's Meteoroid Envronment Office, the source of the blast was a meteoroid about the size of a minivan.

"Elizabeth Silber at Western University has searched for infrasound signals from the explosion," says Cooke. "Infrasound is very low frequency sound which can travel great distances. There were strong signals at 2 stations, enabling a triangulation of the energy source at 37.6N, 120.5W. This is marked by a yellow flag in the map below."

"The energy is estimated at a whopping 3.8 kilotons of TNT (about one fourth the energy of the 'Little Boy' bomb dropped on Hiroshima), so this was a big event," he continues. "I am not saying there was a 3.8 kiloton explosion on the ground in California. I am saying that the meteor possessed this amount of energy before it broke apart in the atmosphere. [The map] shows the location of the atmospheric breakup, not impact with the ground."

"The fact that sonic booms were heard indicates that this meteor penetrated very low in atmosphere, which implies a speed less than 15 km/s (33,500 mph). Assuming this value for the speed, I get a mass for the meteor of around 70 metric tons. Hazarding a further guess at the density of 3 grams per cubic centimeter (solid rock), I calculate a size of about 3-4 meters, or about the size of a minivan."

"This meteor was probably not a Lyrid; without a trajectory, I cannot rule out a Lyrid origin, but I think it likely that it was a background or sporadic meteor."

News and eyewitness reports: #1 , #2 , #3 .

April 19 2012

The 3D Lyrid Meteor Shower

This weekend, NASA scientists, amateur astronomers, and an astronaut on board the International Space Station will attempt the first-ever 3D photography of meteors from Earth and space.

"The annual Lyrid meteor shower peaks on April 21-22," says Bill Cooke, the head of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office. "We’re going to try to photograph some of these 'shooting stars' simultaneously from ground stations, from a research balloon in the stratosphere, and from the space station."

A ScienceCast video previews the 2012 Lyrid meteor shower for amateur sky watchers. Play it http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJNUaGUPnPM

Lyrid meteors come from Comet Thatcher. Every year in late April Earth passes through a stream of debris from the old comet, which has been bringing Lyrid meteors to our planet for at least 2600 years. Specks of Thatcher’s dust hit the top of atmosphere at 110,000 mph and disintegrate in a flurry of meteors. Most years, the shower produces about 15 to 20 Lyrids per hour.

This is a good year to look for Lyrids because the Moon will be new when the shower peaks. Dark skies favor sightings both from Earth and from Earth orbit.

"Even though the Lyrids are not noted for spectacular rates, the combination of a New Moon and a very favorable viewing geometry from the International Space Station (ISS) presents a unique opportunity to simultaneously image shower meteors from above and below," says Cooke.

ISS Flight Engineer Don Pettit will be operating the camera on the space station.

"Even though his equipment was designed for tasks other than meteor observing, Don is a skilled astrophotographer, and we have every confidence that he will maximize the chances of capturing a Lyrid from 400 km above Earth's surface."

As the Space Station passes over North America multiple times on the night of April 21st, a network of all-sky cameras--some operated by amateur astronomers and others by NASA--will be recording the shower. In Bishop, California, a group of high school and middle school students will launch a helium balloon to the stratosphere. The payload floating some 40 km above Earth’s surface will carry an experimental low-cost meteor camera and recorder developed by the Meteoroid Environment Office.

As astrophotographers know, catching a fleet meteor with a single camera takes some luck. Catching one meteor with multiple cameras, some of them on platforms moving as fast as 17,000 mph, scattered from Earth to Earth orbit, sounds more like winning the lottery.

"Actually, we think the odds are fairly good,” says Cooke, who estimates a 1 in 6 chance of a simultaneous catch between the ISS and one of the wide-field ground cameras.
February Fireballs (signup)

If the effort does produce 3D imagery of any Lyrids, Cooke plans to use the photos to test ideas and algorithms for processing date gathered by future space-based meteor observatories. “We’re laying the groundwork for small satellites that might one day be used to monitor meteor showers from Earth orbit,” he explains.

Cooke encourages sky watchers everywhere be alert for meteors this Saturday night. Typical Lyrids are about as bright as the stars of the Big Dipper, so they’re good for beginners. And it's not unusual to see one or two fireballs when the shower peaks. A good time to look is during the hours after midnight, when the shower’s radiant is rising toward its zenith.

Although the Lyrid meteor rate is usually capped at 20 per hour, better displays sometimes occur when Earth glides through an unusually dense clump of debris. In 1982, for instance, astronomers counted as many as 90 Lyrids per hour.

"Such an outburst would be great for our experiment," says Cooke.

Amateur astronomers who wish to help monitor the 2012 Lyrids are encouraged to download the Meteor Counter for iPhones http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2011/13dec_meteorcounter/. The app records meteor counts and reports the data to NASA for possible analysis.

Also, Cooke and colleagues will be "staying up all night" on April 21st to chat with the general public about the shower. Tune in at http://www.nasa.gov/connect/chat/

Author:Dr. Tony Phillips| Production editor: Dr. Tony Phillips | Credit: Science@NASA http://science.nasa.gov/

More Information
Stay Up All Night with NASA to view and discuss the Lyrid meteor shower
http://www.nasa.gov/connect/chat/lyrids2012_chat.html

New App Helps NASA Keep Track of Meteoroids -- Science@NASA http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2011/13dec_meteorcounter/

NASA astronomer Bill Cooke is head of the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office
http://www.nasa.gov/offices/meo/home/index.html

Source: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/science-at-nasa/2012/18apr_lyrids/

http://www.bookofresearch.com/earth-approaching-objects-2012.htm
http://www.bookofresearch.com/planet-viewing.htm


April 13 2012

LYRID METEOR SHOWER:
Earth is approaching the debris field of ancient Comet Thatcher, source of the annual Lyrid meteor shower . Forecasters expect the shower to peak on April 21-22; a nearly-new moon on those dates will provide perfect dark-sky conditions for meteor watching. Usually the shower is mild (10-20 meteors per hour) but unmapped filaments of dust in the comet's tail sometimes trigger outbursts 10 times stronger. [ video ] [ Lyrid chat ]

April 12 2012

Event into space in USA on Thursday, 12 April, 2012 at 16:33 (04:33 PM) UTC
- Skywatchers across the Chicago area reported a streaking fireball in the sky so intense that some thought they’d witnessed a fiery plane crash on the Southeast Side. Reports of the fireball starting coming in about 8:25 p.m., according to a meteor and meteorite sighting blog, lunarmeteoritehunters.blogspot.com, with over 100 people from Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan and Iowa reporting the light show. Descriptions ranged from simply a blue-green fireball to a yellow fireball with a red center and a trailing blue and white tail. John from North Chicago wrote “12sec nw green/blue very bright unknow it only lasted about 12sec but it was a sight to see truly amazing.” But while many delighted in the display, others thought they’d witnessed something much grimmer as emergency crews responded to 126th Street and Avenue 0 on the Far Southeast Side of the city to investigate a possible plane crash. A police helicopter was also called to help search Wolf Lake, which sits on the Illinois-Indiana border near the Hegewisch neighborhood. Searchers found nothing, and authorities soon found that while no aircraft had been reported missing, many skywatchers were reporting a “very bright” meteor falling about 8:20 p.m. and crews stopped their search, according to Fire Media Affairs. No one from NASA or the National Weather Service could immediately be reached for comment. http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/site/?pageid=event_desc&edis_id=CO-20120412-34874-USA

April 11 2012



LYRID METEOR SHOWER:
Earth is approaching the debris field of ancient Comet Thatcher, source of the annual Lyrid meteor shower. Forecasters expect the shower to peak on April 21-22; a nearly-new moon on those dates will provide perfect dark-sky conditions for meteor watching. Usually the shower is mild (10-20 meteors per hour) but unmapped filaments of dust in the comet's tail sometimes trigger outbursts 10 times stronger. [ video ] [ Lyrid chat ] [ more ]



Also read: Lyrid meteor shower to light up the dark April skies Show should be visible all over the world, with peak coming overnight on April


April 2 2012

Earth Has Scores of Mini-Moons, Models Predict About a thousand unseen objects are in orbit at any time, study says.

The asteroid Ida and its moon, Dactyl.
The asteroid Ida and its moon, Dactyl. Similar but much smaller asteroids may orbit Earth as mini-moons. Image courtesy NASA
Andrew Fazekas for National Geographic News Published April 2, 2012 | Link

Our moon is not alone: Scores of unseen mini-moons are now in orbit around Earth , new computer models predict.

What's more, these tiny moons occasionally plummet through our planet's atmosphere, creating brilliant fireballs, the researchers say.

The findings are based on supercomputer simulations of ten million asteroids known to fly through the Earth-moon system. The models show that objects that circle the sun in orbits similar to Earth's are likely to be captured as mini-moons.

(Also see: "Trojan Asteroid Found Sharing Earth's Orbit—A First." )

"We accurately tracked their motion—including the gravitational tugs from the sun and all the other planets and big asteroids in the solar system—and found that 18,000 of [these asteroids] were captured and briefly went into orbit around the Earth," said study co-author Robert Jedicke , an astronomer at the University of Hawaii.

"We estimate that there are one or two washing machine-size mini-moons and about a thousand larger than a softball [orbiting Earth] at any time," he said.

(Related: "Earth Had Two Moons, New Model Suggests." )

The captured moons would orbit Earth in twisted, convoluted paths. In fact, the simulations show that most mini-moons hang around for less than a year before they're either spit back out to orbit the sun or end up on a collision course with Earth, Jedicke said.

"The moon perturbs the orbit of about one in a thousand, so they hit the Earth—some of the meteors that you see at night are actually mini-moons falling to Earth."

Prehistoric Double Moons?

In addition to small space rocks, the models predict that once in awhile Earth captures something even larger.

The team's estimates show that every half century an object the size of a large dump truck—about 33 feet (10 meters) across—joins our roughly 2,100-mile-wide (3,400-kilometer-wide) moon.

And even larger objects—each the size of a football field, or about 328 feet (100 meters) across—can be captured by Earth's gravity every hundred thousand years.

At that size, Jedicke speculates, the extra moons might even be visible to the naked eye.

"A hundred thousand years is about the time frame that human beings have been doing things like leaving their handprints on cave walls, so maybe in that time frame somebody once actually looked into the sky and saw a mini-moon moving across the sky," he added.

(Related: "Moon Oddly Magnetic-Giant Asteroid Crash to Blame?" )

Jedicke and his team are the first to make predictions about mini-moon sizes and distribution, and it appears their predictions are fairly accurate.

The only known mini-moon was a 9.8-foot-wide (3-meter-wide) asteroid dubbed 2006 RH120, which orbited Earth less than a year before resuming its previous life orbiting the sun.

"The size and orbital properties of 2006 RH120 are perfectly consistent with our models," Jedicke said. "Had we done our study ten years ago, we could have predicted that an object like 2006 RH120 would be detected soon."

Mini-Moons Still Hard to Spot

Even with the new simulations, the researchers caution that actually seeing more mini-moons will be challenging, because the objects are relatively small and thus faint.

In addition, the gravitational effects that draw in Earth's extra moons tend to set them whipping around the planet at high speeds, making them even harder to pinpoint.

(Find out about an asteroid that recently crossed between Earth and the moon .)

"We are currently trying to figure out how to use astronomical surveys to spot them regularly," Jedicke said.

For instance, "the largest ones could be detectable by the advanced amateur astronomer with a 50-centimeter-diameter [20-inch-diameter] telescope," he said.

"But discovering new mini-moons will require an asteroid survey that covers much of the sky in a single night and detects objects that are very faint."

The study of Earth's mini-moons was published in March in the journal Icarus .


April 1 2012

APRIL 1st ASTEROID FLYBY:
Newly discovered near-Earth asteroid 2012 EG5 is flying past Earth today about halfway between Earth and the Moon. There's no danger of a collision. At closest approach on April 1st, the Dreamliner -sized space rock will be about 230,000 km from Earth. This morning in Brisbane, Australia, amateur astronomer Dennis Simmons photographed the incoming asteroid:

"On the eve of Earth Hour, whilst most of Australia was asleep, I was alone in my back garden, searching for the ghostly trail of 2012 EG5," says Simmons. "Alone but not lonely, my Celestron C9.25 and Tak EM200 mount were purring along, tracking 2012 EG5 as it flitted through the camera field only a few hours before its closest encounter. As the clock ticked over into 1st April, the estimated magnitude was approx 14.4 as it fast approached the Earth. This is to be no April's Fool hoax – it's for real!"


March 2012
March 15 2012

WILL COMET SWAN SURVIVE? Sungrazing Comet SWAN, discovered just last week by SOHO's SWAN instrument, is diving toward the sun and it is unlikely to survive. SOHO images taken during the late hours of March 14th suggest that the icy visitor is rapidly evaporating:

Comet SWAN is a Kreutz sungrazer , a fragment of the same ancient comet that produced sungrazing Comet Lovejoy in Dec. 2011. Comet Lovejoy famously survived its brush with the sun and put on a flamboyant show after it emerged from the solar fires. While Comet SWAN is cut from the same cloth, it appears to be a smaller fragment, and thus less likely to emerge intact. Much depends on the comet's orbit. "We still don't know how close Comet SWAN will come to the stellar surface," says comet expert Karl Battams of the Naval Research Lab in Washington DC. "I don't think this comet will make it. We have seen Kreutz comets almost as big as this one that have certainly not [survived]. So the odds are stacked against it."

Stay tuned to Karl Battam's blog for updates.

March 14 2012

BRIGHT COMET DIVES INTO RADIATION STORM: A bright comet is diving into the sun. It was discovered just last week by SOHO's SWAN instrument, so it has been named "Comet SWAN." The comet's death plunge ( or "swan dive") comes just as the sun has unleashed a strong flare and radiation storm around Earth. SOHO images of the comet are confused to some degree by energetic protons striking the camera. Nevertheless, you can see Comet SWAN moving through the electronic "snow" in this 3 hour movie: http://spaceweather.com/images2012/13mar12/cme.gif

Couldn't find it? Here's a finder chart .

This is a Kreutz sungrazer, a fragment of the same ancient comet that produced sungrazing Comet Lovejoy in Dec. 2011. According to comet expert Karl Battams of the Naval Research Lab in Washington DC, "Comet SWAN is one of the brightest Kreutz-group comets ever observed by SOHO, although not quite as bright as Comet Lovejoy." Battams forecasts a peak magnitude of -1 for Comet SWAN, while Lovejoy was three magnitudes brighter at -4.

Will Comet SWAN survive its plunge through the sun's atmosphere as Comet Lovejoy did ? Probably not, but experts also said Comet Lovejoy would not survive, and they were happily wrong . Stay tuned to Karl Battam's blog for updates.


March 13 2012

Newly discovered Kreutz Sungrazer - The 2012 "SWAN-grazer": Comet Lovejoy version 2.0
? http://sungrazer.nrl.navy.mil/ index.php?p=news%2FSWAN-kreutz
March 12 2012

Event into space in Norway on Monday, 12 March, 2012 at 12:05 (12:05 PM) UTC - An extremely rare meteorite fell through the roof of a cottage house, situated in an allotment in Rodelokka center of Oslo. According to Norwegian daily VG, the meteorite caused a hole in the roof of the house. The owner of the house, Rune Thomassen told VG that the meteorite piece was about as big as a snowball, and as heavy as a regular stone in its size. Expert on astrobiologi and geophysicist Hans Amundsen believes that it is a very rare meteorite because it contains fragments of many different rocks that are cemented together, a so-called breccia. It is relatively unusual to find pieces of meteorite hitting earth. Norway has recorded fourteen such findings since 1848.The last time was in Moss in 2006.
http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/site/?pageid=event_desc&edis_id=CO-20120312-34482-NOR

UPDATE: Situation Update No. 1 on Monday, 12 March, 2012 at 14:31 UTC - The owners of a small cabin in an urban holiday garden called a kolonihage in Oslo got quite a surprise when they visited the cabin for the first time in a long time over the weekend. First they discovered a hole in the cabin's roof, and then what looked like a stone nearby. It turned out to be a meteorite. Only 14 meteorites have been found in Norway since 1848, the last one in Moss, south of Oslo, in 2006. So the one that hit the Thomassen family's cabin has caught some attention. “We were there yesterday (Sunday),” Rune Thomassen told VG Nett, after visiting the cabin, also known as a hytte, in the garden in Oslo's Rodeløkka district. He can't be sure when the meteorite actually crashed through the cabin's roof, because the cabin had been closed during the winter. Knut Jørgen Røed Ødegaard, an astrophysicist at the University of Oslo and Norway's most enthusiastic promoter of astronomy, thinks the meteorite probably hit during some meteor sightings observed several places around Norway on March 1. “We took in hundreds of tips and have been searching for bits of meteorites,” Ødegaard told VG after examining the Thomassen's discovery at their cabin. “And then we find this right here in Oslo!” Since meteorites travel at speeds of around 360 to 1,000 kilometers an hour, the damage caused to the cabin was not unusual. “This is an incredible discovery, I can hardly believe it,” Ødegaard enthused to VG Nett. “This is unique. This is double-unique.” Hans Amundsen, a member of NASA's astrobiological institute, agreed that the meteorite was “very rare,” also, he told VG Nett, because “you can see in its cross-section that it contains bits of many different particles that are compressed together.” That indicates that another, larger meteorite smashed rock on another planet before the meteorite found in Oslo was propelled into outer space. Amundsen thinks the meteorite can yield valuable information to researchers, and also private collectors may want to pay highly for it. He said meteorites from Mars have sold for around NOK 5,000 per gram. Norway's geological museum has the country's only meteorite collection “and they're the right ones to determine what kind of meteorite this is,” Amundsen told VG. http://hisz.rsoe.hu/alertmap/site/?pageid=event_update_read&edis_id=CO-20120312-34482-NOR&uid=12379
March 10 2012

Traffic Report on 10 March '12 - Four objects reported inside ten LD
Four asteroids are reported inside ten lunar distances (LD) of Earth today. Risk-listed radar target 2012 DW60 enters Earth's Hill sphere and, within the Hill sphere, radar target 2012 DH54 comes its closest this time around, reaching 3.32 LD at 0903 UTC. Further out, 2012 EA is headed from 7.98 to 9.06 LD and 2012 EM1 from 8.89 to 9.71 LD.
Approaching our neighborhood next, 2007 HV4 arrives inside ten LD on April 14th.
This report was posted at 1401 UTC. http://www.hohmanntransfer.com/news4.htm
March 4 2012
Event into space in United Kingdom on Sunday, 04 March, 2012 at 05:09 (05:09 AM) UTC.


- Reports of a "bright light" and an "orange glow" were received by police across Scotland and the north of England around 9.40pm. The Met Office tweeted: "Hi All, for anyone seeing something in the night sky, we believe it was a meteorite." A spokesman for Strathclyde Police said the force had been "inundated" with calls about a bright object in the sky across the west of Scotland. A Durham Police spokeswoman said a number of calls came in around 9.45pm from concerned members of public who had seen a "bright light or a fire in the sky" and believed it may have been incidents involving an aircraft. "It has been confirmed with air traffic control that there are no incidents of aircraft in difficult and nothing registered on radar," she said. "The sightings are believed to be either an asteroid burning out or similar which has been restricted to the upper atmosphere only." Grampian Police said reports of people seeing a "flare or a bright object with a tail" were received from across the region. And Dumfries and Galloway Constabulary said numerous calls were made about a "large ball of fire in the sky" across Annandale and Eskdale. One user wrote on the force's Facebook page: "It was awesome to see! Really big and bright!" Hundreds of people took to Twitter to report similar sightings across Scotland and the north of England. People described seeing a bright fireball moving across the sky with a large tail. The Kielder Observatory also reported the sighting of a "huge fireball" travelling from north to south over Northumberland at 9.41pm. The Observatory posted on Twitter: "Of 30 years observing the sky #fireball best thing I have ever seen period."

Photo(s) were uploaded.
#1: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/ alertmap/photo/34393/ uk_meteorite_20120303_1.jpg
#2: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/ alertmap/photo/34393/ uk_meteorite_20120303_2.jpg
#3: http://hisz.rsoe.hu/ alertmap/photo/34393/ uk_meteorite_20120303_3.jpg

http://hisz.rsoe.hu/ alertmap/site/ ?pageid=event_desc&edis_id= CO-20120304-34393-GBR

Meteor Cam (Dome) - Sat Mar 03 21-40-53 2012.mp4
http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=Np8U68KiDoQ&feature =plcp&context=C304415bUDOE gsToPDskLKwzaQMVaPqDAUvYrU 7v-d

Large fireball captured with my meteor cam 3rd March 2012 9.40, camera is south east facing. Location is the North East of England.

For anyone interested this was captured using Vitamin D software http:// www.vitamindinc.com/

More: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150653583088433.412962.369587468432&type=1
 
 
February 2012

Feb 25 2012


asteroid (2012 BH86) missed earth by 25 lunar distances: diameter ~62 m, velocity 9.29 km/s, energy ~4 megatons. http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr=2012+BH86;orb=1
Feb-March 2012:
An Alignment of Planets in the Sunset Sky : The brightest planets in the night sky are aligning for a must-see show in late February and March 2012. Start looking tonight. [video] [full story ]
 

Feb 23 2012:

THE FIREBALLS OF FEBRUARY: A number of unusual fireballs observed around the USA this month have researchers wondering if Earth is passing through a special "February swarm" of meteoroids NASA Science


Feb 22 2012:
Event into space in Canada on Wednesday, 22 February, 2012 at 12:44 (12:44 PM) UTC.
A meteor that lit up the night sky of western Saskatchewan and eastern Alberta Tuesday night likely landed in the North Battleford area. Those who saw the meteor as it passed through the Earth's atmosphere about 9:45 p.m. described it as a streak or a bright flash of light across the sky. "I get up, I look east and there was a great ball of fire coming out of the sky. It was kind of an orange-yellow on the first part of the ball and then it had a green-reddish tail on the end of it," eyewitness Shane Taylor said. Alan Hildebrand, a professor in the department of geoscience at the University of Calgary, confirmed the flash was a meteor. He says video of the meteor's path was captured in Calgary and Lucky Lake. Hildebrand says the chunk of asteroid broke up on impact with the Earth's surface and weighed about 100 kilograms. RSOE EDIS

UPDATE:
Situation Update No. 1 on Thursday, 23 February, 2012 at 04:20 UTC
For about four seconds Tuesday night the Lloydminster sky was lit up by a fireball. Shortly after 8:40 p.m. local time on Feb. 21 the fireball streaked across the sky. Witness accounts said the light was mostly contained to the southeast corner of the sky. According to Dr. Alan Hildebrand, University of Calgary associate professor and coordinator of the Canadian Fireball Reporting Centre, said the fireball was likely a meteorite. “We know quite a bit actually already,” said Hildebrand. “The fireball was recorded by one all-sky camera by Lucky Lake and one near Calgary. With the two of those we have a good start in terms of understanding, directions and time.” Hildebrand collected information from eyewitness accounts and shared it with the Meteorites and Impacts Advisory Committee. He said the fireball's end point was near Rockhaven, Sask., which is southwest of North Battleford, Sask. Witness accounts indicate an apparent magnitude of flares brighter than -15, compared to the sun which has a magnitude of -26.7 and the moon's is -12.6 in terms of brightness. “The end of it was somewhere around Rockhaven and it was coming from the northeast,” said Hildebrand. The fireball traveled towards 240 degrees with a moderate down angle. The brightness was supplemented by delayed sounds, typically a boom, from witnesses in both Rockhaven and North Battleford. According the Hildebrand the fireball had a strong flare for about one second, which is typical of a reasonably strong rock and fireball duration, suggesting an impact velocity of about 20 kilometres per second. The brightness of the fireball suggests it had an initial mass greater than 100 kilograms. Based off the brightness and the sound Hildebrand said meteorites probably fell. “I don't know where yet, exactly,” said Hildebrand. Though this is the second major fireball in the Lloydminster sky over the past four years, Hildebrand said several bright fireballs could be visible to the night sky in a given year. “In terms of how often meteorites fall, with rocks on the ground. Say a rock the size of your first on the ground in Canada, each year, would have 70 to 100 different cases of a meteorites falling,” said Hildebrand. In November 2008, the Buzzard Coulee meteorite lit up the Lloydminster sky. The fireball and subsequent meteorite impact left small shards of the meteor, believed to have been about 10 tonnes, scattered throughout the area. At the time Hildebrand came out and further researched the impact and meteorite finds. RSOE EDIS


Feb 19 2012

Radar observations of (162421) 2000 ET70, a Near Earth Asteroid with an Aten type orbit which makes an earth close approach on 2012-Feb-19 at ~ 0.045 AU. Due to its size and orbit it is classified as a PHA or Potentially Hazardous Asteroid.

Arecibo range-Doppler image of asteroid 2000 ET70. Range increases towards the bottom and Doppler increases towards the right. The visible range extent of the asteroid is ~750 m, suggesting a diameter of ~1.5 km. The echo bandwidth is ~4 Hz, indicating a spin period of ~10 hours if the view is equatorial. http://www2.ess.ucla.edu/~spn/ 2000ET70.html

Feb 3 2012:
COMET-CLUSTER CLOSE ENCOUNTER: On the morning of February 3rd, Comet Garradd (C/2009 P1) sailed just 0.5 degrees from globular cluster M92 in Hercules. Italian astronomer Rolando Ligustri photographed the encounter using a remotely-controlled 106 mm telescope in New Mexico:

The full-sized image shows the comet's fan-shaped dust tail, which roughly traces the comet's orbit, and its pencil-thin gas tail, which points almost directly away from the sun due to the action of the solar wind.

Although the comet is now receding from the cluster, observers with wide-field telescopes can frame the pair in a single exposure for several mornings to come. They are located in the constellation Hercules, high overhead in northern hemisphere skies before sunrise. Sky and Telescope offers a sky map of the comet's path. Observers with computerized GOTO telescopes can track the comet by plugging in orbital elements from the Minor Planet Center.

At the moment, Comet Garradd has an astronomical magnitude of +6.5, invisible to the naked eye but an easy target for backyard telescopes. Forecasters expect it to brighten by a factor of ~2 in the weeks ahead as the comet approaches Earth for a 1.3 AU close encounter in early March. This could be a good time to invest in a Comet Hunter

Feb 2 2012:

Astrophotographers, ready your cameras. On Friday morning, February 3rd, Comet Garradd (C/2009 P1) will pass approximately 0.5 degrees from globular cluster M92 in Hercules. Last night, Rolando Ligustri took this picture of t he converging pair using a remotely-controlled 106mm telescope in New Mexico:

The ten minute exposure shows the comet's fan-shaped dust tail, which roughly traces the comet's orbit, and its pencil-thin gas tail, which points almost directly away from the sun due to the action of the solar wind.

The star cluster and the comet are both located in the constellation Hercules, high overhead in northern hemisphere skies before sunrise. Sky and Telescope offers a sky map of the comet's path. Observers with computerized GOTO telescopes can track the comet by plugging in orbital elements from the Minor Planet Center.

At the moment, Comet Garradd has an astronomical magnitude of +6.5, invisible to the naked eye but an easy target for backyard telescopes. Forecasters expect it to brighten by a factor of ~2 in the weeks ahead as the comet approaches Earth for a 1.3 AU close encounter in early March. This could be a good time to invest in a Comet Hunter
January 2012

Jan 27 2012:


ASTEROID FLYBY: Newly-discovered asteroid 2012 BX34 will fly past Earth today Jan. 27th only 77,000 km (0.2 lunar distances) away. There is no danger of a collision with the 14-meter wide space rock. Advanced amateur astronomers might be able to observe the flyby as the asteroid brightens to 14th magnitude just before closest approach on Friday at 1530 UT.
[3D orbit] [ephemeris]



Jan 27 2012
10 Asteroids have passed the Earth and will be back in 2013

Source | Translated link (Eng)

MOSCOW, January 27 - RIA Novosti. Asteroid 2012 BX34 size of a three-story building flew in Friday night at a minimum distance of fifty years from Earth - about 60 thousand kilometers, the next time he gets close to the planet in October 2013, but the fly is much more on - 54 million kilometers.

The object was discovered on Wednesday, January 25, members of the American review, "Catalina" (Catalina Sky Survey), whose main task is to find small solar system bodies - asteroids and comets. Later these results were confirmed by observatories "Mount Lemon" (Mt. Lemmon) and "Magdalena Ridge" (Magdalena Ridge).

He was included in the group of celestial bodies, from time to time may be closer to Earth (Near Earth Object - NEO), but did not enter the number of potentially dangerous (Potentially Hazardous Asteroids - PHA), which do not exclude the possibility of a collision with our planet.

On Friday, at 19.25 Moscow time, he broke with the Earth at a distance of 0.00043 astronomical units, or 65.4 thousand kilometers - at 30,000 kilometers above the geostationary orbit. Before the convergence of American astronomers had radar asteroid with the Goldstone radar in California's Mojave Desert.

"The asteroid is so small that we could barely detect it, although we scanned it with a resolution of 3.75 meters," - said the scientists who conducted the radar, on a dedicated forum MPML.

Earlier estimates of the size asteroid were in the range of 8 to 18 meters, possibly after his radar parameters to be determined.

Scientists assure us that no threat to Earth asteroids of this size are not - even if such an object would have entered the Earth's atmosphere, it will likely not have reached the planet's surface is completely burned in the atmosphere.

According to scientists, about once a year in the Earth's atmosphere invades an asteroid with a diameter of several meters. However, they are burned in the atmosphere, causing an outbreak at an altitude of 30-40 kilometers, and do not cause any harm.

Morning, January 28, about 04.44 Moscow time, the asteroid will fly to 293.2 thousand kilometers from the moon, and April 25 razminetsya with Mercury at a distance of 10.4 million kilometers.

The next time an asteroid in 2012 BX34 closer to Earth October 8, 2013, but will fly more than a thousand times more - to 0.37 astronomical units, or 54.7 million miles.



First Meteor Shower of 2012
Arrives Next Week | 2012 Quadrantids Meteor Shower & Skywatching Tips
http://www.space.com/14067-2012-quadrantid-meteor-shower-skywatching.html

Jan 4 2012:

Icy Quadrantid Meteors to Perform Jan. 4 - One of the best but briefest annual meteor showers should be active in the hours before dawn on the morning of Wednesday, January 4th.. http:// www.skyandtelescope.com/ observing/home/ Quadrantid-Meteors-to-Perform-J an-4th-136154248.html
 
News archive for asteroids
 






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