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Comet C/2010 X1 (Elenin) Info, News & Updates
Comet C/201 X1 (Elenin) Orbit Diagram

 Ephemeris | Orbit Diagram | Orbital Elements | Physical Parameters | Close-Approach Data 

Orbit Diagram
Note: Make sure you have Java enabled on your browser to see the applet. This applet is provided as a 3D orbit visualization tool. The applet was implemented using 2-body methods, and hence should not be used for determining accurate long-term trajectories (over several years or decades) or planetary encounter circumstances. For accurate long-term ephemerides, please instead use our Horizons system.
Orbit Viewer

Additional Notes: the orbits shown in the applet are color coded. The planets are white lines, and the asteroid/comet is a blue line. The bright white line indicates the portion of the orbit that is above the ecliptic plane, and the darker portion is below the ecliptic plane. Likewise for the asteroid/comet orbit, the light blue indicates the portion above the ecliptic plane, and the dark blue the portion below the ecliptic plane.

Orbit Viewer applet originally written and kindly provided by Osamu Ajiki (AstroArts), and further modified by Ron Baalke (JPL).


STEREO Coordinated Observations Calendar



Animation of 43 images, 43 x 3 min.exp. in reality = 43 x 0.07 sec. in animation
Credits and more images

STEREO Coordinated Observations Calendar http://stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov/plans.shtml
Current plans for STEREO operations. All dates and times are UTC unless otherwise specified. More detailed plans can be found in the weekly schedules ( Ahead , Behind ). Other planning resources are also provided. This page is also available as plain text .

Contact information for coordinated observation requests can be found on the Solar JOP guidelines page.

Scheduled activities for Week 31:

M Aug 01 (213) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 8-10 UT Ahead: 480 kbps downlink on station 14
T Aug 02 (214) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 8-10 UT Ahead: 480 kbps downlink on station 14
W Aug 03 (215) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 8-10 UT Ahead: 480 kbps downlink on station 63
T Aug 04 (216) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 8-10 UT Ahead: 480 kbps downlink on station 43 Behind: 480 kbps downlink on station 14
F Aug 05 (217) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 10-12 UT Behind: 480 kbps downlink on station 43
S Aug 06 (218) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 8-10 UT S Aug 07 (219) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 8-10 UT

Notes * Aug 1-12 Behind: Spacecraft rolls to observe comet Elenin


Scheduled activities for Week 32:

M Aug 08 (220) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 8-10 UT
T Aug 09 (221) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 8-10 UT Behind: 480 kbps downlink on stations 14 and 63
W Aug 10 (222) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 8-10 UT
T Aug 11 (223) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 8-10 UT Behind: 480 kbps downlink on station 63
F Aug 12 (224) Behind: 135 degree roll to observe comet Elenin, 10-12 UT Ahead: 480 kbps downlink on station 14

Notes * Aug 1-12 Behind: Spacecraft rolls to observe comet Elenin

>> More data




EYES ON THE SOLAR SYSTEM

Jump in and start exploring the Solar System on your own.
Watch the position of the planets and of the satellites; STEREO Ahead, STEREO Behind, Spitzer, Kepler, Rosetta, Voyager 1 & 2, EPOXI, New Horizons, etc
>> Start Exploring

Or go to STEREO Orbit Tool and select a spacecraft and date to get a view of what it sees from different perspectives



Timeline of Comet C/2010 X1 (Elenin):

August 7 – Moves from Leo in the constellation Virgo. Earth distance: 133 million miles. Now at 10th magnitude Might still be visible from the southern U.S. very low in the west during late twilight through a telescope
First week of September – Now at 7th magnitude and visible in binoculars very low in the west to experienced observers in the southern hemisphere. Earth distance on the 3rd: 84.3 million miles
September 11 – Perihelion or closest approach to the sun. Sun-comet distance: 44.6 million miles. Earth distance: 65.1 million miles. Comet lost in the sun/twilight glare and not visible Magnitude 6.2
September 26 - Elenin about 2.25 degrees due north of and in conjunction with the sun (closest to the sun seen from Earth) . Contrary to what some websites are saying, it won’t ‘eclipse’ the sun. It won’t even pass in front of the sun from our perspective. The comet will shine at magnitude 6.0 but won’t be seen because of solar glare. Earth distance: 36.7 million miles
Around October 4 – It’s finally here! Appears low in the morning sky at dawn in the constellation Leo while fading to magnitude 6.3 Earth distance: 27.9 million miles
October 16 – Closest approach to Earth about 0.2338 AU (= 34,980,000 km; 21,73 million miles), Magnitude 7.0.

More info: Source

Some Quick Notes on Comet Elenin

Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin Finder Chart
Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin ephemeris: kml file
Path of Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin in Google Earth: kmz file (requiers google earth)
Link to Orbit Diagram C/2010 X1 Elenin Detailed Info
Elements and Ephemeris for C/2010 X1 (Elenin)
Comet 2010 X1 Elenin for Celestia and Stellarium

Links to orbital elements of observable comets in formats suitable for loading into a number of popular planetarium-type software packages:

Elements are currently available for the following packages:

Information on the MPC's format is here . Information on the other formats may be located on the relevant home pages.
Source


Links to Images/Search:

SECCHI Flight (S/C A and B) Images Query Form
Search for STEREO Images | STEREO Galleries | STEREO Planet Finder
Latest images directory
Latest SECCHI beacon images
Latest Stereo Images
Latest SOHO Images
STEREO Planet Finder
Image artifacts - Beacon data
Images of Comet Elenin
Pictures of C/2010 X1 (Elenin) - Up2date

How to Search for STEREO Images
Select: Camera: HI-1B = Behind HI1| HI-2B = Behind HI2 (the 2 most below in list)
Select Resolution: between 128 (= small) and 2048 (= large = HQ)
Select: List for list of images, Image for image or Slideshow for movie
Select: Date (yymmdd) - recent (yymmdd)
Press search: List of images, Images or Movie/Slideshow (depending ur choice) will appear



Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin News
FAQ
There are 2 ongoing stories that are merging into 1: Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin and the hypothetical 258 TYCHE, also refered to as Nibiru, Nemesis, Marduk, Hercolubus, etc.
Here is more info on 258 TYCHE (FAQ included):


The truth about comet Elenin

David Morrison of the NASA Astrobiology Institute at the NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California, explaining that there is no imminent danger regarding comet Elenin

Compiled below are the some of the most-asked questions, with answers from Don Yeomans of NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., and David Morrison of the NASA Astrobiology Institute at the NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif.

When will Comet Elenin come closest to the Earth and appear the brightest?

Comet Elenin should be at its brightest shortly before the time of its closest approach to Earth on Oct. 16, 2011. At its closest point, it will be 22 million miles (35 million kilometers) from us.

Will Comet Elenin come close to the Earth or between the Earth and the moon?

Comet Elenin will not come closer to Earth than 22 million miles (35 million kilometers). That's more than 90 times the distance to the moon.

Can this comet influence us from where it is, or where it will be in the future? Can this celestial object cause shifting of the tides or even tectonic plates here on Earth?

There have been incorrect speculations on the Internet that alignments of comet Elenin with other celestial bodies could cause consequences for Earth and external forces could cause comet Elenin to come closer. “Any approximate alignments of comet Elenin with other celestial bodies are meaningless, and the comet will not encounter any dark bodies that could perturb its orbit, nor will it influence us in any way here on Earth,” said Don Yeomans, a scientist at NASA JPL.

“Comet Elenin will not only be far away, it is also on the small side for comets,” said Yeomans. “And comets are not the most densely-packed objects out there. They usually have the density of something akin to loosely packed icy dirt.

“So you've got a modest-sized icy dirtball that is getting no closer than 35 million kilometers [about 22 million miles),” said Yeomans. “It will have an immeasurably miniscule influence on our planet. By comparison, my subcompact automobile exerts a greater influence on the ocean's tides than comet Elenin ever will.”

I've heard about three days of darkness because of Comet Elenin. Will Elenin block out the sun for three days?

“As seen from the Earth, comet Elenin will not cross the sun's face,” says Yeomans.

But even if it could cross the sun, which it can't, astrobiologist David Morrison notes that comet Elenin is about 2-3 miles (3-5 kilometers) wide, while the sun is roughly 865,000 miles (1,392,082 kilometers) across. How could such a small object block the sun, which is such a large object?

Let's think about an eclipse of the sun, which happens when the moon appears between the Earth and the sun. The moon is about 2,500 miles (4,000 kilometers) in diameter, and has the same apparent size as the sun when it is about 250,000 miles (400,000 kilometers) away — roughly 100 times its own diameter. For a comet with a diameter of about 2-3 miles (3-5 kilometers) to cover the sun it would have to be within 250 miles (400 kilometers), roughly the orbital altitude of the International Space Station. However, as stated above, this comet will come no closer to Earth than 22 million miles.

I've heard there is a “brown dwarf” theory about Comet Elenin. Would its mass be enough to pull Comet Honda's trajectory a significant amount? Could this be used to determine the mass of Elenin?

Morrison says that there is no ‘brown dwarf theory' of this comet. “A comet is nothing like a brown dwarf. You are correct that the way astronomers measure the mass of one object is by its gravitational effect on another, but comets are far too small to have a measureable influence on anything.”

If we had a black or brown dwarf in our outer solar system, I guess no one could see it, right?

“No, that's not correct,” says Morrison. “If we had a brown dwarf star in the outer solar system, we could see it, detect its infrared energy and measure its perturbing effect on other objects. There is no brown dwarf in the solar system, otherwise we would have detected it. And there is no such thing as a black dwarf.”

Will Comet Elenin be visible to the naked eye when it's closer to us? I missed Hale-Bopp's passing, so I want to know if we'll actually be able to see something in the sky when Elenin passes.

We don't know yet if Comet Elenin will be visible to the naked eye. Morrison says, “At the rate it is going, seeing the comet at its best in early October will require binoculars and a very dark sky. Unfortunately, Elenin is no substitute for seeing comet Hale-Bopp, which was the brightest comet of the past several decades.”

“This comet may not put on a great show. Just as certainly, it will not cause any disruptions here on Earth. But, there is a cause to marvel,” said Yeomans. “This intrepid little traveler will offer astronomers a chance to study a relatively young comet that came here from well beyond our solar system's planetary region. After a short while, it will be headed back out again, and we will not see or hear from Elenin for thousands of years. That's pretty cool.”

This comet has been called ‘wimpy' by NASA scientists. Why?

“We're talking about how a comet looks as it safely flies past us,” said Yeomans of NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office. “Some cometary visitors arriving from beyond the planetary region – like Hale-Bopp in 1997 — have really lit up the night sky where you can see them easily with the naked eye as they safely transit the inner-solar system. But Elenin is trending toward the other end of the spectrum. You'll probably need a good pair of binoculars, clear skies and a dark, secluded location to see it even on its brightest night.”

Why aren't you talking more about Comet Elenin? If these things are small and nothing to worry about, why has there been no public info on Comet Elenin?

Comet Elenin hasn't received much press precisely because it is small and faint. Several new comets are discovered each year, and you don't normally hear about them either. The truth is that Elenin has received much more attention than it deserves due to a variety of Internet postings that are untrue. The information NASA has on Elenin is readily available on the Internet. (See http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-135) If this comet were any danger to anyone, you would certainly know about it. For more information, visit NASA's AsteroidWatch site at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/asteroidwatch/ .

I've heard NASA has observed Elenin many times more than other comets. Is this true, and is NASA playing this comet down?

NASA regularly detects, tracks and characterizes asteroids and comets passing relatively close to Earth using both ground- and space-based telescopes. The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, commonly called “Spaceguard,” discovers these objects, characterizes a subset of them and predicts their paths to determine if any could be potentially hazardous to our planet. For more information, visit the NASA-JPL Near Earth objects site at http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/ .

However, neither NASA nor JPL is in the business of actively observing Elenin or any other comet. Most of the posted observations are made by amateur astronomers around the world. Since Elenin has had so much publicity, it naturally has attracted more observers.

I was looking at the orbital diagram of Comet Elenin on the JPL website, and I was wondering why the orbit shows some angles when zooming? If you pick any other comet, you can see that there are no angles or bends.

Many people are trying to plot the orbit of the comet with the routine on the JPL website, without realizing that this is just a simple visualization tool. While the tool has been recently improved to show smoother trajectories near the sun, it is not a scientific program to generate an accurate orbit. Yeomans explains that the orbit plotter on the Near-Earth Object website is not meant to accurately depict the true motion of objects over long time intervals, nor is it accurate during close planetary encounters. For more accurate long-term plotting, Yeomans suggests using the JPL Horizons system instead: http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/horizons.cgi?find_body=1&body_group=sb&sstr=C/2010%20X1 .

Editor's note: If you want to see some recent images taken from Earth of Comet Elenin, see Ian Musgrave's Astroblog website and Mike Salway's Ice in Space forum. The comet appears as just a fuzzy blob.

Source | Universe Today

More questions? Ask an Astrobiologist


 
October 24th, 2011
Comet Corpse
October 24th, 2011 | Author: spaceweather.com | Link

COMET CORPSE: "Doomsday Comet" Elenin was briefly famous for inaccurate predictions that it might hit Earth. Instead it disintegrated as it approached the sun last month. (Doomsday canceled.) Over the weekend, Italian astronomer Rolando Ligustri spotted the comet's remains. It's the elongated cloud in this Oct. 22nd photo of the star field where Elenin would have appeared if it were still intact:

Another team of astronomers--Ernesto Guido, Giovanni Sostero and Nick Howes--spotted the cloud on the same night. At first they were skeptical. "The cloud was extremely faint and diffuse," says Guido. "We wondered if it might be scattered moonlight or some other transient artifact." But when the team looked again on Oct. 23, the cloud was still there. A two-night blink animation shows that the cloud is moving just as the original comet would have. Note: Some readers have noticed a fast-moving streak to the to the lower right of the debris cloud. That is an unrelated asteroid, 2000 OJ8 (magnitude 14), which happened to be in the field of view at the same time as the cloud of Elenin.

More information about this discovery and continued tracking of the "comet corpse" may be found at the Remanzacco Observatory Astronomy Blog


 
October 20th, 2011
Comet Elenin turned to dust
October 20th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link


NASA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

As we know, the first signs of the breakup of the comet were noted in the middle of August by the Australian amateur astronomer Michael Mattiazzo. With each passing day the pseudo-nucleus of the comet became more diffuse and less bright. Michael observed the comet right up to its perihelion and for several days afterwards. It became apparent that the comet was irreparably breaking up, but the question remained – would we see anything on the SOHO images?

SOHO could not see the comet; neither could northern hemisphere observers, where the comet was due to become visible beginning the second week of October. I made one of the first attempts to find the comet on October 6th when it was still very low on the horizon. These observations were made during navigational twilight. I could not say for sure that I had detected the comet, although combining all the images showed a possible object. However, because motion could not be confirmed, we cannot say this was actually the comet.

The second attempt took place three days later, on October 9th. Down to magnitude 19.7, Comet Elenin was not visible in a field of view of 100 x 100 minutes of arc. The next day Ernesto Guido, Giovanni Sostero, and Nick Howes, using the 2-meter Faulkes telescope also got negative results . Their second attempt on October 17th, one day after closest approach of the comet to the Earth, also had negative results – the remains of the comet were not found.

At the moment there is not one confirmed sighting of the comet. Possibly, searches for what remains of the comet will be carried out by more powerful instruments in a few days when they can observe it without the Moon. But one can already say with certainty that the comet has turned to dust…

 
October 17th 2011
Where's My Doomsday? Remnants of Comet Elenin Pass by Earth Without Incidentby Author: Nancy Atkinson on October 17, 2011 | Link

Image taken with the 2m Faulkes North Telescope of the region of sky where Comet Elenin should have been. Field of view 10 arc minutes across. Stack of up to 13 Bessel R band filtered images (20s) Limiting Magnitude 20.5. Image: (c) Nick Howes, Ernesto Guido, Giovanni Sostero/LCOGT/Faulkes Telescope Project. Used by permission

If you were waiting for Comet Elenin to wreak havoc on Earth so that you didn't have to pay off your credit card debt or go into work today, I'm sorry to inform you that doomsday didn't happen. All that remained of Comet Elenin, — which wasn't much — made its closest pass by Earth yesterday (Oct. 16, 2011) without causing any earthquakes, tsunamis, or high tides and it didn't collide with Earth, either. Moreover, there was no brown dwarf or Mothership hidden in the comet's coma. And in case you didn't notice, this comet did not cause three days of darkness around September 26, 2011.

“I don't know why fearmongers chose my comet,” the comet's discoverer Leonid Elenin told Universe Today. “I received many letters from scared people. But if they believe in conspiracy theories I can't help them.”

For some reason, conspiracy and doomsday theorists chose this small little comet — one that was to come no closer to Earth than 34 million km (21 million miles) during its closest approach on October 16th – to be the harbinger of doom.

But here we are, just fine.

Well, except for wars, terrorism, global warming and other things that the human race inflicts on itself. There are enough bad things going on here on planet Earth that conspiracy theorists shouldn't fabricate doomsday predictions just to needlessly scare people for fun and profit.

So why didn't Comet Elenin cause doomsday?

1. It couldn't have hit Earth, or affected Earth's orbit. The comet was predicted to come 34 million km (21 million miles) away at its closest approach. Just in case you can't figure that out, one object can't hit another at that distance. Plus, the gravity exerted by a small object won't affect Earth either. To put this in perspective, this distance is only a little closer than the closest approach of Venus to Earth, and roughly 100 times the distance from the Earth to the Moon. Nothing happens to Earth when Venus is at closest approach, and Venus is 12,000 kilometers in diameter, while Elenin was 3-5 kilometers across. When the comet was intact it had less than a billionth of the tidal force of the Moon.

Where Comet Elenin should have been in the sky on October 16, 2011 shows nothing left of the the distinegrated comet, and all that is visible are star trails. Credit: Ian Musgrave, using the Global Rent-a-Scope.

2. Comet Elenin fell apart. Sometimes, long period comets that originate from the outer parts of our solar system begin to dissipate as they get closer to the Sun. But Elenin was hit by solar flares from the Sun on August 19 and began disintegrating. When it reached its closest point to the Sun on September 10, it basically was toast. Just recently the location of where the comet should be has become visible in the night sky, out of the Sun's glare. Several images from different amateur astronomers show absolutely nothing. The comet has completely disintegrated and fallen apart.

Earlier today, astronomer Nick Howes and his colleagues using the 2 meter Faulkes telescope took 30 minutes worth of exposures and saw nothing of Comet Elenin in the sky (top image). “We observed objects at magnitude 20.5, but saw no trace at all of Comet Elenin,” Howes told Universe Today. “If it had stayed together, it should have been almost visible with the naked eye now.”

3. What is left of the comet won't cause problems, either. The average density of a comet's coma is about the same as the density of the atmosphere on the Moon, and any rocks or debris that might be left over from the comet are small enough that they would burn up in Earth's atmosphere if Earth does go through the wake of the coma or debris from the comet. And remember, several times a year Earth goes through the debris from comets and all that happens is we get beautiful meteor showers to enjoy.

And after this, don't worry about Comet Elenin or its leftovers. Earth won't pass through it again for another 12,000 years.

So move along, folks, nothing here. Comet Elenin is just another doomsday that didn't happen , just like NASA , Leonid Elenin , and many other people said.

And if you proudly claim you aren't a sheeple and are now just waiting and searching for the next doomsday theory to hang your every hope upon, why don't you try expending your energy on this: Enjoy every day on this beautiful planet and live your life in its fullest. Use real science and learn to think critically. And perhaps you could be a person who could help come up with solutions to some of the real problems on planet Earth.

(And by the way, don't worry about Oct. 21, 2011 (Harold Camping makes another prediction) or Dec. 21, 2012 (Mayan calendar) either. Same story.)

Second image source: Astroblog by Ian Musgrave

 
September 26nd, 2011
Real facts about comet Elenin
September 26th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

 

 

 
  1. At this moment the comet disintegrated into a large number of small fragments, which we may be able to see with the large telescope at the early October;
  2. The fragments of the comet did not change it path and will be flying by orbit of the comet, i.e., not will come to the Earth closer than 35 000 000 km;
  3. Currently the comet Elenin is not visible on the images from the SOHO and STEREO spacecrafts;
  4. Comet visible on images from the spacecraft STEREO-B (HI-1 camera) is comet 45P / (Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova);
  5. Comet Elenin, even if not disintegrated, do not eclipse the Sun, the density of a comet's gas envelopes (coma) is negligible and earthly observer would not have noticed this event;
  6. The Earth will not pass through the tail of the comet, because at now it does not exist;
  7. The comet will not cause and couldn't do any harm to us and our planet.

 
September 22nd, 2011
Will we see a comet Elenin on SOHO images?
September 22nd, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link


ESA / NASA / JPL
 

Since September 23, the comet Elenin may be visible in the field of view of spacecoronagraph C3, installed on the spacecraft SOHO. As  comet disintegrated or still disintegrating, there is a strong likelihood that we did not see anything or see it, but only after post processing of the original images (I recommend not work with JPG files, to avoid possible artifacts). On images comet will move from left to right, ”under” the Sun. It may be seen as a fuzzy, hardly visible cloud. Stay tuned.

 

 


 
September 9th, 2011
The first radio observations of comet Elenin
September 9th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link


NRAO
  American radio astronomers report that did not detect any water coming from any remains of comet Elenin. Amy Lovell observed it for 7 hours on Sept 7 using the Green Bank Telescope (it is not yet in the Arecibo declination window) and did not detect any OH line above the noise level of 2.4 mJy . This puts a limit of a few times 10 7  molecules/second on the gas production rate, which is about 100 times less than earlier predictions. This data may confirm disintegration proccess in comet's nucleus which stareted on mid August. The next radio observations may be carry out on October by Arecibo radio observatory, of course if we will see comet Elenin on images from SOHO spacecraft.

 
September 3rd, 2011
Image of Comet Elenin on Sept 2th 2011



_________________________________________________________________________

Comet Elenin – the final prospect

September 3rd, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

Credits: L. Elenin
  As many readers already know, Comet Elenin has begun the irreversible process of breaking up. We spoke earlier about the probablility of such an outcome, but I considered it less than 50%. On the graph at left you can see a selection of ten comets that approach the Sun closer than 0.5 a.u. The red line shows the boundary, to the left of which, derived from J. Bortle's formula, is the safe zone, but to the right is the zone of disintegration. The yellow color shows Comet Elenin, with absolute magnitude obtained by visual observations, and the blue is from JPL-NASA data. As we see, Bortle's formula, all-in-all, doesn't work too badly. Although there is a bright exception – the green triangle belongs to the unique comet 96P/Machholtz , about which I will speak next time.

Now it is absolutely clear that the comet's drop in brightness, first noted by Michael Mattiazzo on Aug. 20th, was not coincidental – the decay process had already begun, and over the course of the next several days the comet changed greatly. Its pseudo-nucleus became diffuse and extended, and later vanished completely. On images from Sept. 1st in the comet's coma there was no condensation visible, and that meant the comet had already broken up into fairly small pieces, with a maximum size of not more than a hundred meters.

Such a breakup of small comets passing near the Sun is not rare, and in that is nothing surprising. I note that this is a breakup, not an explosion. All the pieces continue to move on the comet's trajectory. The large fragments are likely to continue to disintegrate into smaller ones. It is possible that in October when the comet moves into the morning sky, we will no longer be able to see what once was Comet Elenin. It is possible that something will be visible to large earth-based telescopes. The breakup of a long-period comet fairly close to the Earth (on a Solar System scale) is a rather rare event. During such a breakup we can see the interior of the comet to better understand its construction and composition.

Overall, the most scientifically interesting thing is the breakup scenario, but unfortunately right now the comet is not visible to the largest telescopes or even the Hubble Space Telescope because of its close angular distance from the Sun (small elongation). On the other hand, amateur astronomers, awaiting this comet which might have been visible to the unaided eye, will now not see it, at least visually in their telescopes and binoculars.

We will wait for Sept. 23rd when the comet is due to appear in the field of view of the SOHO space coronagraph. Any result will tell us what we can expect at the beginning of October when the comet once again should appear in the pre-dawn sky. We will wait. The end of this story is near…


 
August 31 2011
Strange RF signal is picked up by radio telescopes in California from Elenin
August 31 2011 | Source

For several days, independent experts have been analyzing radio signals picked up by the USC California Radio Telescope. The signal comes from the transit area of "Elenin" and coincides with the observation G pulse, which also are being analyzed by independent experts. The pulses are equally amazing. In various forums, experts are analyzing the signals...

 

Uploaded by Maidom2009 on Aug 29, 2011


List of Radio Telescopes
 
August 31 2011
UPDATE: Comet Elenin (C/2010 X1) appears to be breaking apart
August 31 2011 | Source: Spaceweather.com

SO MUCH FOR DOOMSDAY: Comet Elenin (C/2010 X1), widely known for inaccurate reports of its threat to Earth, appears to be breaking apart. Observations by amateur astronomer Michael Mattiazzo of Castlemaine, Australia show a marked dimming and elongation of the comet's nucleus over a ten day period:

 
  The behavior of Comet Elenin is akin to that of Comet LINEAR (C/1999 S4), which disintegrated when it approached the sun in back in 2000. Mattiazzo witnessed that event, too. "Yes I did observe the breakup of C/1999 S4 in July 2000," he recalls. "It was quite spectacular watching the nucleus spread out into a cigar shape over a period of days. The apparent breakup of C/2010 X1 is similar, although less visually spectacular." Comets are fragile objects, easily disrupted by solar heat. As a result, the possible breakup of Comet Elenin, while unexpected, comes as no surprise. Readers with pertinent images are invited to submit them here.



 
August 30 2011
Comet Elenin (C/2010 X1) appears to be breaking apart
August 30 2011 | Source: Spaceweather.com

Comet Elenin (C/2010 X1), widely known for inaccurate reports of its threat to Earth, appears to be breaking apart. Observations by amateur astronomer Michael Mattiazzo of Castlemaine, Australia show a rapid dimming and elongation of the comet's nucleus akin to that of Comet LINEAR (C/1999 S4), which also disintegrated when it approached the sun in 2000. Comets are fragile objects, so this development while unexpected comes as no surprise. Readers with pertinent images of Elenin are invited to submit them here .

 
August 27th, 2011
CME 0036: three days before collision with comet Elenin
August 27th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

Coronal mass ejections, which will collide with comet Elenin three days later. This images taken by coronagraphs COR2, which installed on the STEREO spacecrafts.


 
August 21th, 2011
The long ion tail observed behind the comet Elenin
August 21th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

T. Lovejoy
  On the picture taken by the well-known Australian astronomy amateur, Terry Lovejoy , which discovered his comet in 2007, is clearly visible long and thin ion tail stretching almost one degree! Which corresponds to the length of the tail is more than 3,000,000 km! Although this is not a record, the sodium tail of comet Hale-Bopp  had a length of nearly 50 million kilometers! Comet Elenin will pass closest to the Earth on October 16 at distance about 35 million kilometers from our planet.

 
August 20th, 2011
The diameter of comet Elenin's coma confirmed by visual observations from the Earth
August 20th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

M. Mattiazzo
 

My estimate the size of the comet Elenin coma was confirmed by visual observations of an experienced Australian amateur astronomer Michael Mattiazzo. August 19, he estimated the angular size of the coma as 4 arc minutes, which equal to  213,500 km in the linear size. The image of the comet, taken by Michael, on August 19 as you can see on the left and on own author's site .

I remind , that in the next few days,  we have chances to see the comet C/2010 X1 (Elenin) in the coronagraph COR2 field of view, which mounted on the STEREO spacecrafts.

 

 


 
August 19th, 2011
Interaction between comet Elenin and coronal mass ejection from the Sun
August 19th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

August 19, STEREO-B spacecraft has catched a very interesting event – the interaction of the gas coma of comet Elenin and coronal mass ejections from the Sun. On the video we can clearly see dynamics of the cometary tail, which squirming under the influence of powerful pressure of solar wind. After a brief increase, the brightness of the comet began to decreasing within a few days and reached a level of brightness that the comet was in early August.

 
August 18th, 2011
Comet Elenin in STEREO H1B (August 15)
August 18th, 2011 | Author: Ian Musgrave | Link


 

August 15 image of Comet Elenin in the STEREO H1B field of view, compare with the image of the 14th . I've cropped the image, so that Jupiter and Mercury are out of fame compared to the 14th

I've made a little AVI animation of it (1 Mb).

 

 

 

 

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Comet Elenin in STEREO H1B (August 15 & 16)
August 18th, 2011 | Author: Bookofresearch

Elenin, 15 Aug 2011 Img Stereo-B
Uploaded by otraLoly on 17 aug 2011

http://img694.imageshack.us/img694/622/20110815180901tbh1b1.png
http://img37.imageshack.us/img37/8197/20110815160901tbh1b.png

Elenin, 16 Aug 2011 Img Stereo-B
Uploaded by otraLoly on 18 aug 2011

http://img26.imageshack.us/img26/8753/20110816000901tbh1b1.png
http://img560.imageshack.us/img560/618/20110816232901tbh1b.png

 
August 16th, 2011
Comet Elenin Poses No Threat to Earth
August 16th, 2011 | Author: Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. agle@jpl.nasa.gov | Link


Trajectory of comet Elenin. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
› Larger image

Often, comets are portrayed as harbingers of gloom and doom in movies and on television, but most pose no threat to Earth. Comet Elenin, the latest comet to visit our inner solar system, is no exception. Elenin will pass about 22 million miles (35 million kilometers) from Earth during its closest approach on Oct. 16, 2011.

Also known by its astronomical name C/2010 X1, the comet was first detected on Dec. 10, 2010 by Leonid Elenin, an observer in Lyubertsy, Russia, who made the discovery "remotely" using an observatory in New Mexico. At that time, Elenin was about 401 million miles (647 million kilometers) from Earth. Since its discovery, Comet Elenin has – as all comets do – closed the distance to Earth's vicinity as it makes its way closer to perihelion, its closest point to the sun.

NASA scientists have taken time over the last several months to answer your questions. Compiled below are the some of the most popular questions, with answers from Don Yeomans of NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., and David Morrison of the NASA Astrobiology Institute at the NASA Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif.

Most Popular Questions About Comet Elenin

When will Comet Elenin come closest to the Earth and appear the brightest?

Comet Elenin should be at its brightest shortly before the time of its closest approach to Earth on Oct. 16, 2011. At its closest point, it will be 22 million miles (35 million kilometers) from us.

Will Comet Elenin come close to the Earth or between the Earth and the moon?

Comet Elenin will not come closer to Earth than 22 million miles (35 million kilometers). That's more than 90 times the distance to the moon.

Can this comet influence us from where it is, or where it will be in the future? Can this celestial object cause shifting of the tides or even tectonic plates here on Earth?

There have been incorrect speculations on the Internet that alignments of comet Elenin with other celestial bodies could cause consequences for Earth and external forces could cause comet Elenin to come closer. "Any approximate alignments of comet Elenin with other celestial bodies are meaningless, and the comet will not encounter any dark bodies that could perturb its orbit, nor will it influence us in any way here on Earth," said Don Yeomans, a scientist at NASA JPL.

"Comet Elenin will not only be far away, it is also on the small side for comets," said Yeomans. "And comets are not the most densely-packed objects out there. They usually have the density of something akin to loosely packed icy dirt.

"So you've got a modest-sized icy dirtball that is getting no closer than 35 million kilometers [about 22 million miles)," said Yeomans. "It will have an immeasurably minuscule influence on our planet. By comparison, my subcompact automobile exerts a greater influence on the ocean's tides than comet Elenin ever will."

I've heard about three days of darkness because of Comet Elenin. Will Elenin block out the sun for three days?

"As seen from the Earth, comet Elenin will not cross the sun's face," says Yeomans.

But even if it could cross the sun, which it can't, astrobiologist David Morrison notes that comet Elenin is about 2-3 miles (3-5 kilometers) wide, while the sun is roughly 865,000 miles (1,392,082 kilometers) across. How could such a small object block the sun, which is such a large object?

Let's think about an eclipse of the sun, which happens when the moon appears between the Earth and the sun. The moon is about 2,500 miles (4,000 kilometers) in diameter, and has the same apparent size as the sun when it is about 250,000 miles (400,000 kilometers) away -- roughly 100 times its own diameter. For a comet with a diameter of about 2-3 miles (3-5 kilometers) to cover the sun it would have to be within 250 miles (400 kilometers), roughly the orbital altitude of the International Space Station. However, as stated above, this comet will come no closer to Earth than 22 million miles.

I've heard there is a "brown dwarf" theory about Comet Elenin. Would its mass be enough to pull Comet Honda's trajectory a significant amount? Could this be used to determine the mass of Elenin?

Morrison says that there is no 'brown dwarf theory' of this comet. "A comet is nothing like a brown dwarf. You are correct that the way astronomers measure the mass of one object is by its gravitational effect on another, but comets are far too small to have a measureable influence on anything."

If we had a black or brown dwarf in our outer solar system, I guess no one could see it, right?

"No, that's not correct," says Morrison. "If we had a brown dwarf star in the outer solar system, we could see it, detect its infrared energy and measure its perturbing effect on other objects. There is no brown dwarf in the solar system, otherwise we would have detected it. And there is no such thing as a black dwarf."

Will Comet Elenin be visible to the naked eye when it's closer to us? I missed Hale-Bopp's passing, so I want to know if we'll actually be able to see something in the sky when Elenin passes.

We don't know yet if Comet Elenin will be visible to the naked eye. Morrison says, "At the rate it is going, seeing the comet at its best in early October will require binoculars and a very dark sky. Unfortunately, Elenin is no substitute for seeing comet Hale-Bopp, which was the brightest comet of the past several decades."

"This comet may not put on a great show. Just as certainly, it will not cause any disruptions here on Earth. But, there is a cause to marvel," said Yeomans. "This intrepid little traveler will offer astronomers a chance to study a relatively young comet that came here from well beyond our solar system's planetary region. After a short while, it will be headed back out again, and we will not see or hear from Elenin for thousands of years. That's pretty cool."

This comet has been called 'wimpy' by NASA scientists. Why?

"We're talking about how a comet looks as it safely flies past us," said Yeomans of NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office. "Some cometary visitors arriving from beyond the planetary region – like Hale-Bopp in 1997 -- have really lit up the night sky where you can see them easily with the naked eye as they safely transit the inner-solar system. But Elenin is trending toward the other end of the spectrum. You'll probably need a good pair of binoculars, clear skies and a dark, secluded location to see it even on its brightest night."

Why aren't you talking more about Comet Elenin? If these things are small and nothing to worry about, why has there been no public info on Comet Elenin?

Comet Elenin hasn't received much press precisely because it is small and faint. Several new comets are discovered each year, and you don't normally hear about them either. The truth is that Elenin has received much more attention than it deserves due to a variety of Internet postings that are untrue. The information NASA has on Elenin is readily available on the Internet. (See http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-135 ) If this comet were any danger to anyone, you would certainly know about it. For more information, visit NASA's AsteroidWatch site at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/asteroidwatch/ .

I've heard NASA has observed Elenin many times more than other comets. Is this true, and is NASA playing this comet down?

NASA regularly detects, tracks and characterizes asteroids and comets passing relatively close to Earth using both ground- and space-based telescopes. The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, commonly called "Spaceguard," discovers these objects, characterizes a subset of them and predicts their paths to determine if any could be potentially hazardous to our planet. For more information, visit the NASA-JPL Near Earth objects site at http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/ .

However, neither NASA nor JPL is in the business of actively observing Elenin or any other comet. Most of the posted observations are made by amateur astronomers around the world. Since Elenin has had so much publicity, it naturally has attracted more observers.

I was looking at the orbital diagram of Comet Elenin on the JPL website, and I was wondering why the orbit shows some angles when zooming? If you pick any other comet, you can see that there are no angles or bends.

Many people are trying to plot the orbit of the comet with the routine on the JPL website, without realizing that this is just a simple visualization tool. While the tool has been recently improved to show smoother trajectories near the sun, it is not a scientific program to generate an accurate orbit. Yeomans explains that the orbit plotter on the Near-Earth Object website is not meant to accurately depict the true motion of objects over long time intervals, nor is it accurate during close planetary encounters. For more accurate long-term plotting, Yeomans suggests using the JPL Horizons system instead: http://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/horizons.cgi?find_body=1&body_group=sb&sstr=C/2010%20X1 .

DC Agle (818) 393-9011
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
agle@jpl.nasa.gov ________________________________________________________________________________________________


Comet Elenin and asteroid 2005 YU55

August 16th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link


L. Elenin

 

 

 

 

 

I have received many questions as to whether these two objects may collide, or whether they might come so close to one another that they can change their orbits to head directly for Earth. Categorically – NO. Minimum distance between the two objects will happen September 13 (three days after the comet passes perihelion), and that distance is 0.1688 a.u., on the order of 25,252,000 km – 10 million km less than the distance of closest approach of Comet Elenin to our planet, which will take place October 16.

As you know, May 21 was the closest approach of Comet C/2010 X1 to asteroid 1999 RQ176; the objects  passed all of 225,830 km from each other, more than 100 times closer than the minimum distance between Comet Elenin and asteroid 2005 YU55! After that encounter, new position measuments of the comet and asteroid 1999 RQ176 were obtained. On such a short timescale no influence was noted, which means it is practically nil. For that reason, we can absolutely precisely say that Comet Elenin and asteroid 2005 YU55 will pass by one another and it will not even be noticeable!


 
August 13th 2011
A few milestones to the perihelion
August 13th 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

 

1.000 AU – August 3

0.900 AU – August 8

0.800 AU – August 13

0.728 AU – August 18 (aphelion of the orbit of Venus)

0.700 AU – August 19

0.600AU – August 27

0.500 AU – September 5

0.482 AU – September 10

 

 


 
August 11th 2011
The first animation of the comet Elenin from the HI1-B camera
August 11th 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

Images represented in false colors.

Uploaded by SpaceObs op 10 aug 2011

Comet Elenin from STEREO-B spacecraft (HI1-B camera) on Aug. 6 2011. Images represented in false colors.
Cropped frames, zoom 2x.

 
August 10th 2011
Comet Elenin is attracting more and more interest in the scientific community
August 10th 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link


NASA

 

 

 

 


Comet Elenin is attracting more and more interest in the scientific community; at the end of July observations were made on the largest submillimeter telescope in the world JCMT . Since August 1st, observations are ongoing with the space telescope STEREO-B; they will continue for several weeks. It is probable that the comet will be visible in the field of the COR2 (STEREO) coronagraph beginning August 20. Beginning September 23rd, for 6 days, the comet will be visible in the field of view of the LASCO C3 coronagraph on the SOHO spacecraft.

Very recently I received information that several more spacecraft may observe comet C/2010 X1 (Elenin) , specifically Venus Express and Messenger . These observations will allow us to obtain unique information about the comet at the time of its perihelion when it will not be observable from the Earth.

Observations are planned with SPICAV UV in the 110-310 nm wavelength band on the Venus Express spacecraft and Messenger's MASCS spectrograph. Moreover, by simultaneous observations from two spacecraft with different points of view, with the VMC camera on Venus Express and the MDIS camera on Messenger, it is possible to obtain a three-dimensional model of the comet's coma! It is possible that comet C/2010 X1 (Elenin) may become the brightest comet that these two spacecraft may observe during their entire time of service. I hope this application is approved and the observations take place.


 
August 9th 2011
Observing Comet Elenin
August 9th 2011 | Responsible NASA Official: [e-mail address: gurman<at>gsfc<dot>nasa<dot>gov] | Link


Comet Elenin as seen by HI1-B on Aug. 6, 2011.

As Comet Elenin passed to within just 7 million kilometers of the STEREO (Behind) spacecraft, NASA rolled the spacecraft to take a look at it (Aug. 1, 2011) with its wide angle HI-2 instrument. Though the observation lasted only a little over an hour, the fuzzy looking comet can be seen moving across a small portion of the sky. STEREO will be taking these one-hour observations every day through August 12. The comet is seen by the HI-2 telescope between August 1-5, and by the higher resolution HI-1 telescope between August 6-12. From August 15 onward, the comet enters the HI-1 telescope's nominal field of view, at which time we should enjoy continuous viewing of the comet. Over time, we expect the comet to be visible in the SOHO C3 coronagraph on September 23 for six days and possibly STEREO's COR2 coronagraph as well between August 20 and September 1. The closest the comet will come to Earth is 0.23 AU (Astronomical Units), or approximately 34-million kilometers, so it poses no threat to us. We will attempt to keep this page updated with the latest observations.

We do expect the comet to appear to become significantly brighter over the next few days as it gets closer to the Sun-spacecraft line as a consequence of a process known as foward-scattering. STEREO-B, which is far from Earth, happens to see this "back-lighting" effect as a consequence of its location relative to the comet, and is not indicative of a sudden change in the comet itself.

Russian astronomer Leonid Elenin discovered the comet last December at International Scientific Optical Network's robotic observatory near Mayhill, New Mexico.

From Earth, presently the comet is a faint smudge of light in deep sky exposures. By late August comet Elenin could be visible to the naked eye as a dim "fuzzy star" with a tail.

 
August 7th 2011
Comet Elenin“smells” like bitter almonds
August 7th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

JCMT / JAC
 

M. Drahus, University of California at Los Angeles; Bin Yang, University of Hawaii ; and J. Hoge, Joint Astronomy Centre , report the detection of HCN  (Hydrogen cyanide) in comet C/2010 X1 on July 30 when at heliocentric distance r = 1.07 AU. Observations between July 30.153 and 30.249 UT at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope show the J = 4-3 line with area about 0.1 K km/s in antenna temperature scale. Assuming an isotropic production of gas at velocity 0.5 km/s and a Boltzmann distribution of energy levels at 50 K, the derived HCN production rate is 1.5 x 10 25 molecules/s, comparable to the mean level measured in comet 103P/Hartley at the same heliocentric distance in late 2010 (Drahus et al. 2011, Ap.J. 734, L4).

http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/iau/cbet/002700/CBET002781.txt (subscription required).


 
August 5th, 2011
A new animation of the comet Elenin flyby
August 5th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

Comet Elenin from STEREO-B spacecraft on Aug. 3 2011. Comet just passed through Orion's Belt a few hours ago.Cropped frames, zoom 2x.


NASA/STEREO

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Data and movies
August 5th, 2011 | Author: Bookofresearch
Source

 
August 4th, 2011
Diameter of coma* of comet Elenin exceeded 200,000 km
August 4th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link


GFSC / NASA / L. Elenin
>>Enlarge
 
A few hours ago I got the first original comet images in FITS format, taken on August 1 (many thanks to Karl Battams, STEREO team member). Several frames was damaged, but the team believes that will solve this problem at the next session. I stacked all images by the comet movement, this has increase the singnal/noise ratio, see the comet with more “details”.

So, the first results. The comet has grown. Now the diameter of it's outer coma* exceeded 200,000 km! Of course, at this time we have only low resolution images, but they still allow us to estimateits current size. I want to remind you that the outer coma*, it's very discharged gas envelope, not the nucleus itself, estimates of the nucleus size has not changed. On the left picture you can see the comet itself, as well as the angular size of the Sun, if it was located at the same distance as comet. Impressive?

* coma: A spherical cloud of material surrounding the head of a comet. This material is mostly gas that the Sun has caused to boil off the comet's icy nucleus. This gas is illuminated both by reflected sunlight and light emitted by excited molecules. A cometary coma can extend up to a million miles from the nucleus.
Wikipedia Coma (cometary)

 
August 3th, 2011
Observing Comet Elenin
August 3th, 2011 | Responsible NASA Official: [e-mail address: gurman<at>gsfc<dot>nasa<dot>gov] | Link

As Comet Elenin passed to within just 7 million kilometers of the STEREO (Behind) spacecraft, NASA rolled the spacecraft to take a look at it (Aug. 1, 2011) with its wide angle HI-2 instrument. Though the observation lasted only a little over an hour, the fuzzy looking comet can be seen moving across a small portion of the sky. STEREO will be taking these one-hour observations every day for almost the next week or more until it enters its nominal field of view, at which time we should enjoy continuous viewing of the comet. Over time, we expect the comet to be visible in the SOHO C3 coronagraph on September 23 for six days and possibly STEREO's COR2 coronagraph as well. The closest the comet will come to Earth is 0.23 AU (Astronomical Units), or approximately 34-million kilometers, so it poses no threat to us. We will attempt to keep this page updated with the latest observations.

We do expect the comet to appear to become significantly brighter over the next few days as it gets closer to the Sun-spacecraft line as a consequence of a process known as "foward-scattering". STEREO-B, which is far from Earth, happens to see this "back-lighting" effect as a consequence of its location relative to the comet, and is not indicative of a sudden change in the comet itself.

Russian astronomer Leonid Elenin discovered the comet last December at International Scientific Optical Network's robotic observatory near Mayhill, New Mexico.

From Earth, presently the comet is a faint smudge of light in deep sky exposures. By late August comet Elenin could be visible to the naked eye as a dim "fuzzy star" with a tail.




_______________________________________________________________________________________


Now visible in STEREO Behind HI2-B: Mercury and Earth
August 3th, 2011 | Author: Bookofresearch


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The first images of the comet Elenin from STEREO-B
August 3th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

A few hours ago, the first images of the comet, obtained with the camera HI2-B of spacecraft STEREO-B, was available. Animation is created from the so-called beacon frames, which used for checking the accuracy of pointing and exposures settings . Original, full size frames will be downloaded to the Earth on August 4. At this time, the comet will appear on the images from HI-1B camera, which has higher resolution. The study of comets on the unique images taken with the STEREO spacecraft has just begun!


GSFC / NASA
>> Enlarge

On the left you see the constellation Orion, on the right Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin

 
August 2th, 2011
Elenin enters Earth's orbital around the sun today
August 2th, 2011 | Author: Bookofresearch

Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin will enter Earth's orbital around the sun today and will pass through the Orion Belt,
you should be able to see Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin from the Southern hemisphere
with a telescope.

 
August 1st, 2011
Now: Jupiter visible in STEREO BEHIND HI1 | Mercury visible in STEREO Ahead HI1
August 1st, 2011 | Author: Bookofresearch
Updated on August 2, 2011

Jupiter is now visible in STEREO Behind HI1, the bright dot right from the sun is Jupiter
Date and time of image 1: Date: 2011-08-01 | Time 07:18:40

Mercury now visible in STEREO Ahead HI1, the bright dot in the center of the image is Mercury
Date and time of image 2: Date: 2011-08-01 | Time: 15:18:01

You can check them @ Planetfinder

Image 1 | >> Enlarge
Jupiter visible in STEREO Behind HI1
Date and time of image:
Date: 2011-08-01 | Time 07:18:40
Image 2 | >> Enlarge
Mercury visible in STEREO Ahead HI1
Date and time of image:
Date: 2011-08-01 | Time: 15:18:01
________________________________________________________________________________________________

Elenin Aug 1st Position to Stereo B

August 1st, 2011 | Author: TBar1984 | Link

Stereo B's location in relation to Elenin on Aug 1st, 2011.

 
July 31st, 2011
5 hours to closest approach
July 31st, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

Closest approach of the comet Elenin and the spacecraft STEREO-B will be exactly in 5 hours, on 12:40 UT. Objects will be pass at a distance of 7,400,196 km of each other. Observations of the comet will begin in less than a day.

___________________________________________________________________________


“Jul 31 – Aug 12 Behind: Spacecraft rolls to observe comet Elenin”

July 31st, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link (posted on July 11, 2011)

The SECCHI team requests to roll the Behind spacecraft by 135 degrees for two hours per day each day between Aug 1 (or late on Sep 31) and Aug 12 to observe comet Elenin as it flies within 0.05 AU of the spacecraft. Observations of the comet at a wide variety of phase angles will provide information about composition. There's also a possibility that the in situ instruments on Behind will see the ion tail.

The requested two hours per day will include the roll and settle times, with the roll starting on an even hour boundary, and then back to nominal roll and settled on the next even hour boundary. A more detailed plan will be sent to APL (Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University).

The test of the roll maneuver to observe Comet Elenin from Behind is expected to be scheduled sometime in week 29 (July 18-24).

http://stereo-ssc.nascom.nasa.gov

 
July 29th, 2011
First Image of Comet Elenin in Space
July 29th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link

The first image of the comet Elenin from the spacecraft was received on July 22, by SWAN instrument (Solar Wind Anisotropies), installed on the SOHO  space solar observatory. The comet was detected on the images from July 22 by Vladimir Bezugly.

Image resolution is small, but comet is visible in the coordinates - 160 0 (slightly right from the center of image). Images taken at distance about 240,000,000 km (1.6 AU). I would like to remind you, that two days later, comet C/2010 X1 (Elenin)  will be in 32 times closer to the other spacecraft  - STEREO-B.


LATMOS / IPSL


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Elenin July 29th Data - Proxima Centauri

July 29th, 2011 | Author: TBar1984 | Link

Latest July 29th JLP Elenin data, upcoming Stereo B observation, and distant solar system objects. Introduces the question of our Solar System being within the Hill Sphere influence of our closest, and closing, triple star system.


 
July 19, 3011
First observation of space based radiotelescope RadioAstron. By SpaceObs.org
  Uploaded by SpaceObs on July 19, 2011

Russian space based radiotelescope RadioAstron (Spectr-R) spotted by ISON-NM observatory at 65000 km from the Earth.
First object (blinking) is upper-stage rocket "Fregat-SB". Second object - RadioAstron. Images taken on July 18 2011, only 8 hours after launch from Baikonur. This images is first optical measurement of this spacecraft in the World.


 
The test roll was succesful, let's wait for August 1
July 28th, 2011 | Author: Leonid Elenin | Link


NASA / GSFC
Image of Comet McNaught


Karl Battams, one of the STEREO team members confirmed the successful test roll of the spacecraft to 135 degrees. Carl noted that the angle of roll is chosen very well. From 1 to August 5, the comet will be visible in the instrument HI-2B, then observations will be continue with HI-1B camera. The first data will be transmitted to Earth on August 2-3 and will be available from August 4.

The comet may be a very bright and one of the main objectives of the observations will be study the effect of forward scattering. This effect can increase the brightness of comet by several magnitudes and we will see this effect from SOHO spacecraft, in late September.

Observation's shedule you can find here .


About Comet Elenin (C/2010 X1)



Comet Elenin (C/2010 X1) | Source
You may have heard the news: Comet Elenin is coming to the inner-solar system this fall. Comet Elenin (also known by its astronomical name C/2010 X1), was first detected on Dec. 10, 2010 by Leonid Elenin, an observer in Lyubertsy, Russia, who made the discovery "remotely" using the ISON-NM observatory near Mayhill, New Mexico. At the time of the discovery, the comet was about 647 million kilometers (401 million miles) from Earth. Over the past four-and-a-half months, the comet has – as comets do – closed the distance to Earth's vicinity as it makes its way closer to perihelion (its closest point to the sun). As of May 4, Elenin's distance is about 274 million kilometers (170 million miles).

"That is what happens with these long-period comets that come in from way outside our planetary system," said Don Yeomans of NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "They make these long, majestic, speedy arcs through our solar system, and sometimes they put on a great show. But not Elenin. Right now that comet looks kind of wimpy."

How does a NASA scientist define cometary wimpiness?

"We're talking about how a comet looks as it safely flies past us," said Yeomans. "Some cometary visitors arriving from beyond the planetary region – like Hale-Bopp in 1997 -- have really lit up the night sky where you can see them easily with the naked eye as they safely transit the inner-solar system. But Elenin is trending toward the other end of the spectrum. You'll probably need a good pair of binoculars, clear skies, and a dark, secluded location to see it even on its brightest night."

Comet Elenin should be at its brightest shortly before the time of its closest approach to Earth on Oct. 16 of this year. At its closest point, it will be 35 million kilometers (22 million miles) from us. Can this icy interloper influence us from where it is, or where it will be in the future? What about this celestial object inspiring some shifting of the tides or even tectonic plates here on Earth? There have been some incorrect Internet speculations that external forces could cause comet Elenin to come closer.

"Comet Elenin will not encounter any dark bodies that could perturb its orbit, nor will it influence us in any way here on Earth," said Yeomans. "It will get no closer to Earth than 35 million kilometers [about 22 million miles]. "

"Comet Elenin will not only be far away, it is also on the small side for comets," said Yeomans. "And comets are not the most densely-packed objects out there. They usually have the density of something akin to loosely packed icy dirt.

"So you've got a modest-sized icy dirtball that is getting no closer than 35 million kilometers," said Yeomans. "It will have an immeasurably miniscule influence on our planet. By comparison, my subcompact automobile exerts a greater influence on the ocean's tides than comet Elenin ever will."

Yeomans did have one final thought on comet Elenin.

"This comet may not put on a great show. Just as certainly, it will not cause any disruptions here on Earth. But there is a cause to marvel," said Yeomans. "This intrepid little traveler will offer astronomers a chance to study a relatively young comet that came here from well beyond our solar system's planetary region. After a short while, it will be headed back out again, and we will not see or hear from Elenin for thousands of years. That's pretty cool."

NASA detects, tracks and characterizes asteroids and comets passing relatively close to Earth using both ground- and space-based telescopes. The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, commonly called "Spaceguard," discovers these objects, characterizes a subset of them, and predicts their paths to determine if any could be potentially hazardous to our planet.

JPL manages the Near-Earth Object Program Office for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington, DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

More information about asteroids and near-Earth objects is at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/asteroidwatch , and on Twitter: @asteroidwatch .

Links:
Spaceobs.org (Website Leonid Elenin)
Comet Elenin FAQ
Comet Elenin - Official Facebook Page
Images of Comet Elenin



Knowledge and Awareness in Case of Risk

Because of all the doomsday controverse lately surrounding 2012, this is posted just for your knowledge, its always better to be safe than sorry at any time, 2 care is 2 share :)

This info comes from FEMA and informs you about what to do in case of risk, emergency or disaster.
Prepare for Hazards


Safe Zones:
1.   Move 150+ miles from the coasts.
2.   Move at least 600 feet above sea level.
3.   Move away from volcanoes and super volcanoes (like Yellowstone in northwestern USA).
4.   Move away from earthquake /seismic/avalanche/fault zones (like the New Madrid Fault Zone in central USA).
5.   Move away from dams that could break.
6.   Move away from nuclear power plants that could become compromised.
7.   Move away from high elevations where radiation levels will be highest.
8.   Move away from large populated areas where food riots could escalate into chaos and mayhem.


 

 


Bookofresearch 2011 ©

 
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Usefull Links
STEREO Coordinated Observations Calendar
STEREO Ahead
STEREO Behind
Where is STEREO?
JPL Small-Body Database Browser
JPL Small-Body Database Search
Engine

JPL Solar System Dynamics
STEREO Planet Finder
STEREO Orbit Tool
Elements and Ephemeris for C/2010 X1 (Elenin)
Solar System Simulator
Asteroid Watch
Visual Database of International Observations of Comets
Elements and Ephemeris for C/2010 X1 (Elenin)
Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin ephemeris: kml file
Path of Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin in Google Earth: kmz file (requiers google earth)
Light Visual Curve of Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin Updated July 22 2011
Water Production Rates of Comet C/2010 X1 Elenin

Images:
SECCHI Flight (S/C A and B) Images Query Form
Raw FITS files (20MB .tar.gz) for August 1st, 2011
Raw FITS files (20MB .tar.gz) for August 3rd, 2011
Cropped Quicktime movie (130KB) from August 1st, 2011
Cropped Quicktime movie (130KB) from August 2nd, 2011
Cropped Quicktime movie (202KB) from August 3rd, 2011
Search for STEREO Images
Latest images directory
Latest SECCHI beacon images
Image artifacts - Beacon data
Images of Comet Elenin
Pictures of C/2010 X1 (Elenin) - Up2date
STEREO Galleries
Images Elenin France

Worried About Comet Elenin? FAQs
Ask an Astrobiologist
Meteor Section Visual Report Form

Spaceobs.org (Website Leonid Elenin)
Comet Elenin FAQ
Comet Elenin - Official Facebook Page
SpaceObs Youtube Channel
Astroblog website

Current Comets
Weekly Information about Bright Comets
Comet C/2010 X1 (Elenin)

Orbit Diagram C/2010 X1 Elenin Detailed Info
Orbital elements for current date and coordinates of C/2010 X1 Elenin for the year

Orbit Diagram 45P/Honda-Mrkos-Pajdusakova Detailed Info
Orbit Diagram P/2006 T1 (Levy) Detailed Info

Wikipedia C/2010 X1
Wikipedia Comet
Comet Catalog
Wikipedia Alpha Centauri
Wikipedia Proxima Centauri
List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects
Wikipedia SOHO
Wikipedia STEREO
Wikipedia Coma (cometary)

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The Earth Impact Database
Artemis simulator with Astro Track and Super-map generator
The Latest World Meteor / Meteorite News
Monitoring Near-Earth-Objects
Observable Planets

Near Earth Object Program - Orbits (NASA/JPL)
Asteroid Orbit Viewer (AstroArts Inc.)
Cometary Orbit Viewer (AstroArts Inc.)
Asteroid Orbital Elements (Lowell Observatory)
Elements & Ephemerides: Observable Comets (IAU)
Sky&Telescope January 2001 - Astronomy Online
Sky&Telescope February 2000 - Astronomy Online
Centaur Research Project (Robert von Heeren)
OrbitViewer Invocation for Comets (David James Benn)
OrbitViewer Invocation for Asteroids (David James Benn)